Viewpoint on what may be considered as evidence and how to obtain it when designing health-promoting and inclusive green spaces

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Viewpoint on what may be considered as evidence and how to obtain it when designing health-promoting and inclusive green spaces. / Stigsdotter, Ulrika Karlsson; Zhang, Gaochao; Gramkow, Marie Christoffersen; Sidenius, Ulrik.

In: Archnet-IJAR : International Journal of Architectural Research, 2023.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Stigsdotter, UK, Zhang, G, Gramkow, MC & Sidenius, U 2023, 'Viewpoint on what may be considered as evidence and how to obtain it when designing health-promoting and inclusive green spaces', Archnet-IJAR : International Journal of Architectural Research. https://doi.org/10.1108/ARCH-08-2022-0177

APA

Stigsdotter, U. K., Zhang, G., Gramkow, M. C., & Sidenius, U. (2023). Viewpoint on what may be considered as evidence and how to obtain it when designing health-promoting and inclusive green spaces. Archnet-IJAR : International Journal of Architectural Research. https://doi.org/10.1108/ARCH-08-2022-0177

Vancouver

Stigsdotter UK, Zhang G, Gramkow MC, Sidenius U. Viewpoint on what may be considered as evidence and how to obtain it when designing health-promoting and inclusive green spaces. Archnet-IJAR : International Journal of Architectural Research. 2023. https://doi.org/10.1108/ARCH-08-2022-0177

Author

Stigsdotter, Ulrika Karlsson ; Zhang, Gaochao ; Gramkow, Marie Christoffersen ; Sidenius, Ulrik. / Viewpoint on what may be considered as evidence and how to obtain it when designing health-promoting and inclusive green spaces. In: Archnet-IJAR : International Journal of Architectural Research. 2023.

Bibtex

@article{090f5289b2f84cb0897ecdfb2f507dfd,
title = "Viewpoint on what may be considered as evidence and how to obtain it when designing health-promoting and inclusive green spaces",
abstract = "PurposeThe point of departure for this viewpoint paper is the current development in which landscape architects are working towards achieving the United Nations sustainable development goals and the associated cross-cutting pledge “Leave No One Behind”. The sustainable development goals 3 and 11 can be achieved through landscape projects that are inclusive and health promoting, and the authors argue that an evidence-based design process is needed to ensure that project designs deliver what they promise. However, most landscape architects are not trained in evidence-based design and are therefore unsure of what can be used as evidence. A further challenge is the lack of relevant and applicable research evidence for design processes.Design/methodology/approachThe authors present a process model for evidence-based health design in landscape architecture as an overall framework on which the authors base their arguments. The model includes four topics of evidence: target group, human health, environment and use of nature. For each topic, the authors present their view on what may be considered as evidence and where it can be found or generated. The study view is supported by a detailed presentation of where and how evidence was found and generated in a design project for an accessible and health-promoting forest trail for people with mobility disabilities.FindingsThe authors suggest a broad definition of evidence, and that the design process should draw on evidence from relevant research and practice disciplines. Evidence can be found in multiple sources, for example, scientific articles, theoretical works and design guidelines. It can also be generated by landscape architects themselves, for example, through landscape analyses and stakeholder workshops. The evidence should guide and support the landscape architect and not dictate the design process.Practical implicationsThe authors hope that the knowledge provided on the evidence-based health design process and on where to collect or how to generate evidence may inspire landscape architects in their future health design projects.Originality/valuePeople with mobility disabilities face many health challenges and should potentially be able to benefit from visiting green spaces. The authors hope that the knowledge provided on the evidence-based health design process and on where to collect or how to generate evidence may inspire landscape architects in their future health design projects.",
author = "Stigsdotter, {Ulrika Karlsson} and Gaochao Zhang and Gramkow, {Marie Christoffersen} and Ulrik Sidenius",
year = "2023",
doi = "10.1108/ARCH-08-2022-0177",
language = "English",
journal = "Archnet-IJAR",
issn = "2631-6862",
publisher = "Emerald Insight",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Viewpoint on what may be considered as evidence and how to obtain it when designing health-promoting and inclusive green spaces

AU - Stigsdotter, Ulrika Karlsson

AU - Zhang, Gaochao

AU - Gramkow, Marie Christoffersen

AU - Sidenius, Ulrik

PY - 2023

Y1 - 2023

N2 - PurposeThe point of departure for this viewpoint paper is the current development in which landscape architects are working towards achieving the United Nations sustainable development goals and the associated cross-cutting pledge “Leave No One Behind”. The sustainable development goals 3 and 11 can be achieved through landscape projects that are inclusive and health promoting, and the authors argue that an evidence-based design process is needed to ensure that project designs deliver what they promise. However, most landscape architects are not trained in evidence-based design and are therefore unsure of what can be used as evidence. A further challenge is the lack of relevant and applicable research evidence for design processes.Design/methodology/approachThe authors present a process model for evidence-based health design in landscape architecture as an overall framework on which the authors base their arguments. The model includes four topics of evidence: target group, human health, environment and use of nature. For each topic, the authors present their view on what may be considered as evidence and where it can be found or generated. The study view is supported by a detailed presentation of where and how evidence was found and generated in a design project for an accessible and health-promoting forest trail for people with mobility disabilities.FindingsThe authors suggest a broad definition of evidence, and that the design process should draw on evidence from relevant research and practice disciplines. Evidence can be found in multiple sources, for example, scientific articles, theoretical works and design guidelines. It can also be generated by landscape architects themselves, for example, through landscape analyses and stakeholder workshops. The evidence should guide and support the landscape architect and not dictate the design process.Practical implicationsThe authors hope that the knowledge provided on the evidence-based health design process and on where to collect or how to generate evidence may inspire landscape architects in their future health design projects.Originality/valuePeople with mobility disabilities face many health challenges and should potentially be able to benefit from visiting green spaces. The authors hope that the knowledge provided on the evidence-based health design process and on where to collect or how to generate evidence may inspire landscape architects in their future health design projects.

AB - PurposeThe point of departure for this viewpoint paper is the current development in which landscape architects are working towards achieving the United Nations sustainable development goals and the associated cross-cutting pledge “Leave No One Behind”. The sustainable development goals 3 and 11 can be achieved through landscape projects that are inclusive and health promoting, and the authors argue that an evidence-based design process is needed to ensure that project designs deliver what they promise. However, most landscape architects are not trained in evidence-based design and are therefore unsure of what can be used as evidence. A further challenge is the lack of relevant and applicable research evidence for design processes.Design/methodology/approachThe authors present a process model for evidence-based health design in landscape architecture as an overall framework on which the authors base their arguments. The model includes four topics of evidence: target group, human health, environment and use of nature. For each topic, the authors present their view on what may be considered as evidence and where it can be found or generated. The study view is supported by a detailed presentation of where and how evidence was found and generated in a design project for an accessible and health-promoting forest trail for people with mobility disabilities.FindingsThe authors suggest a broad definition of evidence, and that the design process should draw on evidence from relevant research and practice disciplines. Evidence can be found in multiple sources, for example, scientific articles, theoretical works and design guidelines. It can also be generated by landscape architects themselves, for example, through landscape analyses and stakeholder workshops. The evidence should guide and support the landscape architect and not dictate the design process.Practical implicationsThe authors hope that the knowledge provided on the evidence-based health design process and on where to collect or how to generate evidence may inspire landscape architects in their future health design projects.Originality/valuePeople with mobility disabilities face many health challenges and should potentially be able to benefit from visiting green spaces. The authors hope that the knowledge provided on the evidence-based health design process and on where to collect or how to generate evidence may inspire landscape architects in their future health design projects.

U2 - 10.1108/ARCH-08-2022-0177

DO - 10.1108/ARCH-08-2022-0177

M3 - Journal article

JO - Archnet-IJAR

JF - Archnet-IJAR

SN - 2631-6862

ER -

ID: 339617425