Survival and failure types after radiation therapy of vulvar cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Standard

Survival and failure types after radiation therapy of vulvar cancer. / Vorbeck, Christina Steen; Vogelius, Ivan Richter; Banner-Voigt, Marie Louise Vorndran Cøln; Mathiesen, Hanne From; Mirza, Mansoor Raza.

In: Clinical and Translational Radiation Oncology, Vol. 5, 2017, p. 20-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Vorbeck, CS, Vogelius, IR, Banner-Voigt, MLVC, Mathiesen, HF & Mirza, MR 2017, 'Survival and failure types after radiation therapy of vulvar cancer', Clinical and Translational Radiation Oncology, vol. 5, pp. 20-27. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctro.2017.06.002

APA

Vorbeck, C. S., Vogelius, I. R., Banner-Voigt, M. L. V. C., Mathiesen, H. F., & Mirza, M. R. (2017). Survival and failure types after radiation therapy of vulvar cancer. Clinical and Translational Radiation Oncology, 5, 20-27. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctro.2017.06.002

Vancouver

Vorbeck CS, Vogelius IR, Banner-Voigt MLVC, Mathiesen HF, Mirza MR. Survival and failure types after radiation therapy of vulvar cancer. Clinical and Translational Radiation Oncology. 2017;5:20-27. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctro.2017.06.002

Author

Vorbeck, Christina Steen ; Vogelius, Ivan Richter ; Banner-Voigt, Marie Louise Vorndran Cøln ; Mathiesen, Hanne From ; Mirza, Mansoor Raza. / Survival and failure types after radiation therapy of vulvar cancer. In: Clinical and Translational Radiation Oncology. 2017 ; Vol. 5. pp. 20-27.

Bibtex

@article{dc7c43a009bd45859cacaabb6b9e0ab9,
title = "Survival and failure types after radiation therapy of vulvar cancer",
abstract = "Background and purpose: Describe the survival rates and distribution of events on competing failure types in vulvar carcinoma after treatment with chemoradiation (CRT) or radiation (RT) alone.Material and methods: We included patients with vulvar carcinoma treated with CRT or RT between 2009 and 2014. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. We performed a competing risk analysis and included five competing events: loco-regional failure (LRF), distant metastasis, LRF plus distant metastasis, and death without evidence of disease, with the remaining patients denoted alive without evidence of disease.Results: 87 patients were treated. Progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 3 years were 40% and 57%, respectively. 41.3% of patients relapsed, most often loco-regionally. We saw significantly worse PFS and OS for patients older than 68 (p = 0.011/p = 0.010) and for patients treated with definitive RT (p = 0.004/p = 0.005). Competing risk analysis showed increased risk of LRF, and that death was most often related to vulvar cancer. Death without disease recurrence was less frequent, even in the elderly.Conclusions: LRF was the most common event. PFS and OS were inferior for elderly patients and patients treated definitively. A better understanding of these differences may be used to define risk adapted treatment strategies.",
author = "Vorbeck, {Christina Steen} and Vogelius, {Ivan Richter} and Banner-Voigt, {Marie Louise Vorndran C{\o}ln} and Mathiesen, {Hanne From} and Mirza, {Mansoor Raza}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.ctro.2017.06.002",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "20--27",
journal = "Clinical and Translational Radiation Oncology",
issn = "2405-6308",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Survival and failure types after radiation therapy of vulvar cancer

AU - Vorbeck, Christina Steen

AU - Vogelius, Ivan Richter

AU - Banner-Voigt, Marie Louise Vorndran Cøln

AU - Mathiesen, Hanne From

AU - Mirza, Mansoor Raza

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Background and purpose: Describe the survival rates and distribution of events on competing failure types in vulvar carcinoma after treatment with chemoradiation (CRT) or radiation (RT) alone.Material and methods: We included patients with vulvar carcinoma treated with CRT or RT between 2009 and 2014. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. We performed a competing risk analysis and included five competing events: loco-regional failure (LRF), distant metastasis, LRF plus distant metastasis, and death without evidence of disease, with the remaining patients denoted alive without evidence of disease.Results: 87 patients were treated. Progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 3 years were 40% and 57%, respectively. 41.3% of patients relapsed, most often loco-regionally. We saw significantly worse PFS and OS for patients older than 68 (p = 0.011/p = 0.010) and for patients treated with definitive RT (p = 0.004/p = 0.005). Competing risk analysis showed increased risk of LRF, and that death was most often related to vulvar cancer. Death without disease recurrence was less frequent, even in the elderly.Conclusions: LRF was the most common event. PFS and OS were inferior for elderly patients and patients treated definitively. A better understanding of these differences may be used to define risk adapted treatment strategies.

AB - Background and purpose: Describe the survival rates and distribution of events on competing failure types in vulvar carcinoma after treatment with chemoradiation (CRT) or radiation (RT) alone.Material and methods: We included patients with vulvar carcinoma treated with CRT or RT between 2009 and 2014. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. We performed a competing risk analysis and included five competing events: loco-regional failure (LRF), distant metastasis, LRF plus distant metastasis, and death without evidence of disease, with the remaining patients denoted alive without evidence of disease.Results: 87 patients were treated. Progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 3 years were 40% and 57%, respectively. 41.3% of patients relapsed, most often loco-regionally. We saw significantly worse PFS and OS for patients older than 68 (p = 0.011/p = 0.010) and for patients treated with definitive RT (p = 0.004/p = 0.005). Competing risk analysis showed increased risk of LRF, and that death was most often related to vulvar cancer. Death without disease recurrence was less frequent, even in the elderly.Conclusions: LRF was the most common event. PFS and OS were inferior for elderly patients and patients treated definitively. A better understanding of these differences may be used to define risk adapted treatment strategies.

U2 - 10.1016/j.ctro.2017.06.002

DO - 10.1016/j.ctro.2017.06.002

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29594213

VL - 5

SP - 20

EP - 27

JO - Clinical and Translational Radiation Oncology

JF - Clinical and Translational Radiation Oncology

SN - 2405-6308

ER -

ID: 195963155