Proteome-wide mapping of the Drosophila acetylome demonstrates a high degree of conservation of lysine acetylation

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Proteome-wide mapping of the Drosophila acetylome demonstrates a high degree of conservation of lysine acetylation. / Weinert, Brian T; Wagner, Sebastian A; Horn, Heiko; Henriksen, Peter; Liu, Wenshe R; Olsen, Jesper V; Jensen, Lars J; Choudhary, Chuna Ram.

In: Science Signaling, Vol. 4, No. 183, 2011, p. ra48.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Weinert, BT, Wagner, SA, Horn, H, Henriksen, P, Liu, WR, Olsen, JV, Jensen, LJ & Choudhary, CR 2011, 'Proteome-wide mapping of the Drosophila acetylome demonstrates a high degree of conservation of lysine acetylation', Science Signaling, vol. 4, no. 183, pp. ra48. https://doi.org/10.1126/scisignal.2001902

APA

Weinert, B. T., Wagner, S. A., Horn, H., Henriksen, P., Liu, W. R., Olsen, J. V., ... Choudhary, C. R. (2011). Proteome-wide mapping of the Drosophila acetylome demonstrates a high degree of conservation of lysine acetylation. Science Signaling, 4(183), ra48. https://doi.org/10.1126/scisignal.2001902

Vancouver

Weinert BT, Wagner SA, Horn H, Henriksen P, Liu WR, Olsen JV et al. Proteome-wide mapping of the Drosophila acetylome demonstrates a high degree of conservation of lysine acetylation. Science Signaling. 2011;4(183):ra48. https://doi.org/10.1126/scisignal.2001902

Author

Weinert, Brian T ; Wagner, Sebastian A ; Horn, Heiko ; Henriksen, Peter ; Liu, Wenshe R ; Olsen, Jesper V ; Jensen, Lars J ; Choudhary, Chuna Ram. / Proteome-wide mapping of the Drosophila acetylome demonstrates a high degree of conservation of lysine acetylation. In: Science Signaling. 2011 ; Vol. 4, No. 183. pp. ra48.

Bibtex

@article{cfee0f36baa8471895987c8250414daa,
title = "Proteome-wide mapping of the Drosophila acetylome demonstrates a high degree of conservation of lysine acetylation",
abstract = "Posttranslational modification of proteins by acetylation and phosphorylation regulates most cellular processes in living organisms. Surprisingly, the evolutionary conservation of phosphorylated serine and threonine residues is only marginally higher than that of unmodified serines and threonines. With high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 1981 lysine acetylation sites in the proteome of Drosophila melanogaster. We used data sets of experimentally identified acetylation and phosphorylation sites in Drosophila and humans to analyze the evolutionary conservation of these modification sites between flies and humans. Site-level conservation analysis revealed that acetylation sites are highly conserved, significantly more so than phosphorylation sites. Furthermore, comparison of lysine conservation in Drosophila and humans with that in nematodes and zebrafish revealed that acetylated lysines were significantly more conserved than were nonacetylated lysines. Bioinformatics analysis using Gene Ontology terms suggested that the proteins with conserved acetylation control cellular processes such as protein translation, protein folding, DNA packaging, and mitochondrial metabolism. We found that acetylation of ubiquitin-conjugating E2 enzymes was evolutionarily conserved, and mutation of a conserved acetylation site impaired the function of the human E2 enzyme UBE2D3. This systems-level analysis of comparative posttranslational modification showed that acetylation is an anciently conserved modification and suggests that phosphorylation sites may have evolved faster than acetylation sites.",
keywords = "Acetylation, Animals, Computational Biology, DNA Primers, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Humans, Lysine, Mass Spectrometry, Phosphorylation, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Proteomics, Species Specificity, Yeasts",
author = "Weinert, {Brian T} and Wagner, {Sebastian A} and Heiko Horn and Peter Henriksen and Liu, {Wenshe R} and Olsen, {Jesper V} and Jensen, {Lars J} and Choudhary, {Chuna Ram}",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1126/scisignal.2001902",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "ra48",
journal = "Science Signaling",
issn = "1945-0877",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "183",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Proteome-wide mapping of the Drosophila acetylome demonstrates a high degree of conservation of lysine acetylation

AU - Weinert, Brian T

AU - Wagner, Sebastian A

AU - Horn, Heiko

AU - Henriksen, Peter

AU - Liu, Wenshe R

AU - Olsen, Jesper V

AU - Jensen, Lars J

AU - Choudhary, Chuna Ram

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Posttranslational modification of proteins by acetylation and phosphorylation regulates most cellular processes in living organisms. Surprisingly, the evolutionary conservation of phosphorylated serine and threonine residues is only marginally higher than that of unmodified serines and threonines. With high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 1981 lysine acetylation sites in the proteome of Drosophila melanogaster. We used data sets of experimentally identified acetylation and phosphorylation sites in Drosophila and humans to analyze the evolutionary conservation of these modification sites between flies and humans. Site-level conservation analysis revealed that acetylation sites are highly conserved, significantly more so than phosphorylation sites. Furthermore, comparison of lysine conservation in Drosophila and humans with that in nematodes and zebrafish revealed that acetylated lysines were significantly more conserved than were nonacetylated lysines. Bioinformatics analysis using Gene Ontology terms suggested that the proteins with conserved acetylation control cellular processes such as protein translation, protein folding, DNA packaging, and mitochondrial metabolism. We found that acetylation of ubiquitin-conjugating E2 enzymes was evolutionarily conserved, and mutation of a conserved acetylation site impaired the function of the human E2 enzyme UBE2D3. This systems-level analysis of comparative posttranslational modification showed that acetylation is an anciently conserved modification and suggests that phosphorylation sites may have evolved faster than acetylation sites.

AB - Posttranslational modification of proteins by acetylation and phosphorylation regulates most cellular processes in living organisms. Surprisingly, the evolutionary conservation of phosphorylated serine and threonine residues is only marginally higher than that of unmodified serines and threonines. With high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 1981 lysine acetylation sites in the proteome of Drosophila melanogaster. We used data sets of experimentally identified acetylation and phosphorylation sites in Drosophila and humans to analyze the evolutionary conservation of these modification sites between flies and humans. Site-level conservation analysis revealed that acetylation sites are highly conserved, significantly more so than phosphorylation sites. Furthermore, comparison of lysine conservation in Drosophila and humans with that in nematodes and zebrafish revealed that acetylated lysines were significantly more conserved than were nonacetylated lysines. Bioinformatics analysis using Gene Ontology terms suggested that the proteins with conserved acetylation control cellular processes such as protein translation, protein folding, DNA packaging, and mitochondrial metabolism. We found that acetylation of ubiquitin-conjugating E2 enzymes was evolutionarily conserved, and mutation of a conserved acetylation site impaired the function of the human E2 enzyme UBE2D3. This systems-level analysis of comparative posttranslational modification showed that acetylation is an anciently conserved modification and suggests that phosphorylation sites may have evolved faster than acetylation sites.

KW - Acetylation

KW - Animals

KW - Computational Biology

KW - DNA Primers

KW - Drosophila Proteins

KW - Drosophila melanogaster

KW - Humans

KW - Lysine

KW - Mass Spectrometry

KW - Phosphorylation

KW - Protein Processing, Post-Translational

KW - Proteomics

KW - Species Specificity

KW - Yeasts

U2 - 10.1126/scisignal.2001902

DO - 10.1126/scisignal.2001902

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 21791702

VL - 4

SP - ra48

JO - Science Signaling

JF - Science Signaling

SN - 1945-0877

IS - 183

ER -

ID: 40289934