Diversity and Conflict

Research output: Working paperResearch

Standard

Diversity and Conflict. / Arbatli, Cemal Eren; Ashraf, Quamrul H.; Galor, Oded; Klemp, Marc Patrick Brag.

2020.

Research output: Working paperResearch

Harvard

Arbatli, CE, Ashraf, QH, Galor, O & Klemp, MPB 2020 'Diversity and Conflict'. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3527039

APA

Arbatli, C. E., Ashraf, Q. H., Galor, O., & Klemp, M. P. B. (2020). Diversity and Conflict. Bravo Working Paper, No. 2020-005 https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3527039

Vancouver

Arbatli CE, Ashraf QH, Galor O, Klemp MPB. Diversity and Conflict. 2020 Feb 25. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3527039

Author

Arbatli, Cemal Eren ; Ashraf, Quamrul H. ; Galor, Oded ; Klemp, Marc Patrick Brag. / Diversity and Conflict. 2020. (Bravo Working Paper; No. 2020-005 ).

Bibtex

@techreport{027afb5d3f644943afb0692666b3808c,
title = "Diversity and Conflict",
abstract = "This research advances the hypothesis and establishes empirically that interpersonal population diversity has contributed significantly to the emergence, prevalence, recurrence, and severity of intrasocietal conflicts. Exploiting an exogenous source of variations in population diversity across nations and ethnic groups, it demonstrates that population diversity, as determined predominantly during the exodus of humans from Africa tens of thousands of years ago, has contributed significantly to the risk and intensity of historical and contemporary internal conflicts, accounting for the confounding effects of geographical, institutional, and cultural characteristics, as well as for the level of economic development. These findings arguably reflect the adverse effect of population diversity on interpersonal trust, its contribution to divergence in preferences for public goods and redistributive policies, and its impact on the degree of fractionalization and polarization across ethnic, linguistic, and religious groups.",
keywords = "Faculty of Social Sciences, Social Conflict, Population Diversity, Ethnic Fractionalization, Ethnic Polarization, Interpersonal Trust, Political Preferences",
author = "Arbatli, {Cemal Eren} and Ashraf, {Quamrul H.} and Oded Galor and Klemp, {Marc Patrick Brag}",
year = "2020",
month = "2",
day = "25",
doi = "10.2139/ssrn.3527039",
language = "English",
series = "Bravo Working Paper",
number = "2020-005",
type = "WorkingPaper",

}

RIS

TY - UNPB

T1 - Diversity and Conflict

AU - Arbatli, Cemal Eren

AU - Ashraf, Quamrul H.

AU - Galor, Oded

AU - Klemp, Marc Patrick Brag

PY - 2020/2/25

Y1 - 2020/2/25

N2 - This research advances the hypothesis and establishes empirically that interpersonal population diversity has contributed significantly to the emergence, prevalence, recurrence, and severity of intrasocietal conflicts. Exploiting an exogenous source of variations in population diversity across nations and ethnic groups, it demonstrates that population diversity, as determined predominantly during the exodus of humans from Africa tens of thousands of years ago, has contributed significantly to the risk and intensity of historical and contemporary internal conflicts, accounting for the confounding effects of geographical, institutional, and cultural characteristics, as well as for the level of economic development. These findings arguably reflect the adverse effect of population diversity on interpersonal trust, its contribution to divergence in preferences for public goods and redistributive policies, and its impact on the degree of fractionalization and polarization across ethnic, linguistic, and religious groups.

AB - This research advances the hypothesis and establishes empirically that interpersonal population diversity has contributed significantly to the emergence, prevalence, recurrence, and severity of intrasocietal conflicts. Exploiting an exogenous source of variations in population diversity across nations and ethnic groups, it demonstrates that population diversity, as determined predominantly during the exodus of humans from Africa tens of thousands of years ago, has contributed significantly to the risk and intensity of historical and contemporary internal conflicts, accounting for the confounding effects of geographical, institutional, and cultural characteristics, as well as for the level of economic development. These findings arguably reflect the adverse effect of population diversity on interpersonal trust, its contribution to divergence in preferences for public goods and redistributive policies, and its impact on the degree of fractionalization and polarization across ethnic, linguistic, and religious groups.

KW - Faculty of Social Sciences

KW - Social Conflict

KW - Population Diversity

KW - Ethnic Fractionalization

KW - Ethnic Polarization

KW - Interpersonal Trust

KW - Political Preferences

UR - https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/c5831b16-d981-3345-8938-a4b2c5e41bb1/

U2 - 10.2139/ssrn.3527039

DO - 10.2139/ssrn.3527039

M3 - Working paper

T3 - Bravo Working Paper

BT - Diversity and Conflict

ER -

ID: 248851320