Number needed to treat with rosuvastatin to prevent first cardiovascular events and death among men and women with low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein: justification for the use of statins in prevention: an intervention trial evaluating rosuvastatin (JUPITER)

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Paul M Ridker, Jean G MacFadyen, Francisco A H Fonseca, Jacques Genest, Antonio M Gotto, John J P Kastelein, Wolfgang Koenig, Peter Libby, Alberto J Lorenzatti, Børge Nordestgaard, James Shepherd, James T Willerson, Robert J Glynn, JUPITER Study Group, Paul M Ridker, Jean G MacFadyen, Francisco A H Fonseca, Jacques Genest, Antonio M Gotto, John J P Kastelein & 8 more Wolfgang Koenig, Peter Libby, Alberto J Lorenzatti, Børge G Nordestgaard, James Shepherd, James T Willerson, Robert J Glynn, JUPITER Study Group

BACKGROUND: As recently demonstrated, random allocation to rosuvastatin results in large relative risk reductions for first cardiovascular events among apparently healthy men and women with low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol but elevated levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. However, whether the absolute risk reduction among such individuals justifies wide application of statin therapy in primary prevention is a controversial issue with broad policy and public health implications. METHODS AND RESULTS: Absolute risk reductions and consequent number needed to treat (NNT) values were calculated across a range of end points, timeframes, and subgroups using data from Justification for the Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER), a randomized evaluation of rosuvastatin 20 mg versus placebo conducted among 17 802 apparently healthy men and women with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <130 mg/dL and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein >or=2 mg/L. Sensitivity analyses were also performed to address the potential impact that alternative statin regimens might have on a similar primary prevention population. For the end point of myocardial infarction, stroke, revascularization, or death, the 5-year NNT within JUPITER was 20 (95% CI, 14 to 34). All subgroups had 5-year NNT values for this end point below 50; as examples, 5-year NNT values were 17 for men and 31 for women, 21 for whites and 19 for nonwhites, 18 for those with body mass index 300). CONCLUSIONS: Absolute risk reductions and consequent NNT values associated with statin therapy among those with elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol are comparable if not superior to published NNT values for several widely accepted interventions for primary cardiovascular prevention, including the use of statin therapy among those with overt hyperlipidemia. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier NCT00239681.
Original languageEnglish
JournalCirculation. Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes
Volume2
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)616-23
Number of pages8
ISSN1941-7713
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2009

Bibliographical note

Keywords: Age Factors; Body Mass Index; C-Reactive Protein; Cholesterol, LDL; Continental Population Groups; Double-Blind Method; Endpoint Determination; Female; Fluorobenzenes; Hospitalization; Humans; Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors; Male; Metabolic Syndrome X; Myocardial Infarction; Myocardial Revascularization; Primary Prevention; Pyrimidines; Risk Factors; Stroke; Sulfonamides

ID: 20596318