Mental and physical health effects of meaningful work and rewarding family responsibilities

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Mental and physical health effects of meaningful work and rewarding family responsibilities. / Dich, Nadya; Lund, Rikke; Hansen, Åse Marie; Rod, Naja Hulvej.

In: PLOS ONE, Vol. 14, No. 4, e0214916, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Dich, N, Lund, R, Hansen, ÅM & Rod, NH 2019, 'Mental and physical health effects of meaningful work and rewarding family responsibilities', PLOS ONE, vol. 14, no. 4, e0214916. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0214916

APA

Dich, N., Lund, R., Hansen, Å. M., & Rod, N. H. (2019). Mental and physical health effects of meaningful work and rewarding family responsibilities. PLOS ONE, 14(4), [e0214916]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0214916

Vancouver

Dich N, Lund R, Hansen ÅM, Rod NH. Mental and physical health effects of meaningful work and rewarding family responsibilities. PLOS ONE. 2019;14(4). e0214916. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0214916

Author

Dich, Nadya ; Lund, Rikke ; Hansen, Åse Marie ; Rod, Naja Hulvej. / Mental and physical health effects of meaningful work and rewarding family responsibilities. In: PLOS ONE. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 4.

Bibtex

@article{d8ce455e624b4ac6aeb2394e66348e0c,
title = "Mental and physical health effects of meaningful work and rewarding family responsibilities",
abstract = "Positive feelings about work and family responsibilities benefit psychological well-being, but their physical health effects remain unexplored. The study assessed whether meaningful work and reward from taking care of family benefitted physical health to the same degree as mental health. Participants were 181 Danes aged 49-51. Participants reported on working conditions, providing care to family, depressive symptoms, and perceived stress. Physical health was operationalized as a physiological dysregulation (e.g., hypertension, high levels of blood sugar and cholesterol, high body mass index). A multidimensional index of physiological dysregulation was created using parameters of cardiovascular, metabolic, and immune function. As expected, meaningful work and sense of reward from taking care of family members were associated with better mental health. However, in women, the very same factors were positively associated with higher physiological dysregulation. We conclude that work and family factors promoting psychological well-being may have physical health trade-offs, particularly in women.",
author = "Nadya Dich and Rikke Lund and Hansen, {{\AA}se Marie} and Rod, {Naja Hulvej}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0214916",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
journal = "P L o S One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mental and physical health effects of meaningful work and rewarding family responsibilities

AU - Dich, Nadya

AU - Lund, Rikke

AU - Hansen, Åse Marie

AU - Rod, Naja Hulvej

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Positive feelings about work and family responsibilities benefit psychological well-being, but their physical health effects remain unexplored. The study assessed whether meaningful work and reward from taking care of family benefitted physical health to the same degree as mental health. Participants were 181 Danes aged 49-51. Participants reported on working conditions, providing care to family, depressive symptoms, and perceived stress. Physical health was operationalized as a physiological dysregulation (e.g., hypertension, high levels of blood sugar and cholesterol, high body mass index). A multidimensional index of physiological dysregulation was created using parameters of cardiovascular, metabolic, and immune function. As expected, meaningful work and sense of reward from taking care of family members were associated with better mental health. However, in women, the very same factors were positively associated with higher physiological dysregulation. We conclude that work and family factors promoting psychological well-being may have physical health trade-offs, particularly in women.

AB - Positive feelings about work and family responsibilities benefit psychological well-being, but their physical health effects remain unexplored. The study assessed whether meaningful work and reward from taking care of family benefitted physical health to the same degree as mental health. Participants were 181 Danes aged 49-51. Participants reported on working conditions, providing care to family, depressive symptoms, and perceived stress. Physical health was operationalized as a physiological dysregulation (e.g., hypertension, high levels of blood sugar and cholesterol, high body mass index). A multidimensional index of physiological dysregulation was created using parameters of cardiovascular, metabolic, and immune function. As expected, meaningful work and sense of reward from taking care of family members were associated with better mental health. However, in women, the very same factors were positively associated with higher physiological dysregulation. We conclude that work and family factors promoting psychological well-being may have physical health trade-offs, particularly in women.

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0214916

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0214916

M3 - Journal article

VL - 14

JO - P L o S One

JF - P L o S One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 4

M1 - e0214916

ER -

ID: 217334254