Low plasma concentrations of interleukin 10 in severe malarial anaemia compared with cerebral and uncomplicated malaria

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Low plasma concentrations of interleukin 10 in severe malarial anaemia compared with cerebral and uncomplicated malaria. / Kurtzhals, J A; Adabayeri, V; Goka, B Q; Akanmori, B D; Oliver-Commey, J O; Nkrumah, F K; Behr, C; Hviid, L.

In: Lancet, Vol. 351, No. 9118, 1998, p. 1768-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Kurtzhals, JA, Adabayeri, V, Goka, BQ, Akanmori, BD, Oliver-Commey, JO, Nkrumah, FK, Behr, C & Hviid, L 1998, 'Low plasma concentrations of interleukin 10 in severe malarial anaemia compared with cerebral and uncomplicated malaria' Lancet, vol. 351, no. 9118, pp. 1768-72. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(97)09439-7

APA

Kurtzhals, J. A., Adabayeri, V., Goka, B. Q., Akanmori, B. D., Oliver-Commey, J. O., Nkrumah, F. K., ... Hviid, L. (1998). Low plasma concentrations of interleukin 10 in severe malarial anaemia compared with cerebral and uncomplicated malaria. Lancet, 351(9118), 1768-72. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(97)09439-7

Vancouver

Kurtzhals JA, Adabayeri V, Goka BQ, Akanmori BD, Oliver-Commey JO, Nkrumah FK et al. Low plasma concentrations of interleukin 10 in severe malarial anaemia compared with cerebral and uncomplicated malaria. Lancet. 1998;351(9118):1768-72. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(97)09439-7

Author

Kurtzhals, J A ; Adabayeri, V ; Goka, B Q ; Akanmori, B D ; Oliver-Commey, J O ; Nkrumah, F K ; Behr, C ; Hviid, L. / Low plasma concentrations of interleukin 10 in severe malarial anaemia compared with cerebral and uncomplicated malaria. In: Lancet. 1998 ; Vol. 351, No. 9118. pp. 1768-72.

Bibtex

@article{38213c70a06b11dd86a6000ea68e967b,
title = "Low plasma concentrations of interleukin 10 in severe malarial anaemia compared with cerebral and uncomplicated malaria",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Severe anaemia is a major complication of malaria but little is known about its pathogenesis. Experimental models have implicated tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in induction of bone-marrow suppression and eythrophagocytosis. Conversely, interleukin 10 (IL-10), which mediates feed-back regulation of TNF, stimulates bone-marrow function in vitro and counteracts anaemia in mice. We investigated the associations of these cytokines with malarial anaemia. METHODS: We enrolled 175 African children with malaria into two studies in 1995 and 1996. In the first study, children were classified as having severe anaemia (n=10), uncomplicated malaria (n=26), or cerebral anaemia (n=41). In the second study, patients were classified as having cerebral malaria (n=33) or being fully conscious (n=65), and the two groups were subdivided by measured haemoglobin as normal (>110 g/L), moderate anaemia (60-90 g/L), and severe anaemia (<50 g/L). IL-10 and TNF concentrations were measured by ELISA in plasma samples from all patients. FINDINGS: IL-10 concentrations were significantly lower in patients with severe anaemia than in all other groups. In 1995, geometric mean plasma IL-10 in patients with severe anaemia was 270 pg/mL (95{\%} CI 152-482) compared with 725 pg/mL (465-1129) in uncomplicated malaria and 966 pg/mL (612-1526) in cerebral malaria (p<0.03). In 1996, fully conscious patients with severe anaemia also had significantly lower IL-10 concentrations than all other groups, including cerebral-malaria patients with severe anaemia and all patients with moderate anaemia (p<0.001). In both studies, TNF concentrations were significantly higher in cerebral malaria than in fully conscious patients (p<0.01). By contrast, the ratio of TNF to IL-10 was significantly higher in fully conscious patients with severe anaemia than in all other groups (p<0.001). INTERPRETATION: Our findings identify severe malarial anaemia as a distinct disorder in which insufficient IL-10 response to high TNF concentrations may have a central role.",
author = "Kurtzhals, {J A} and V Adabayeri and Goka, {B Q} and Akanmori, {B D} and Oliver-Commey, {J O} and Nkrumah, {F K} and C Behr and L Hviid",
note = "Keywords: Analysis of Variance; Anemia; Case-Control Studies; Child; Child, Preschool; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay; Humans; Interleukin-10; Malaria, Cerebral; Malaria, Falciparum; Severity of Illness Index; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha",
year = "1998",
doi = "10.1016/S0140-6736(97)09439-7",
language = "English",
volume = "351",
pages = "1768--72",
journal = "Lancet",
issn = "0140-6736",
publisher = "TheLancet Publishing Group",
number = "9118",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low plasma concentrations of interleukin 10 in severe malarial anaemia compared with cerebral and uncomplicated malaria

AU - Kurtzhals, J A

AU - Adabayeri, V

AU - Goka, B Q

AU - Akanmori, B D

AU - Oliver-Commey, J O

AU - Nkrumah, F K

AU - Behr, C

AU - Hviid, L

N1 - Keywords: Analysis of Variance; Anemia; Case-Control Studies; Child; Child, Preschool; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay; Humans; Interleukin-10; Malaria, Cerebral; Malaria, Falciparum; Severity of Illness Index; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha

PY - 1998

Y1 - 1998

N2 - BACKGROUND: Severe anaemia is a major complication of malaria but little is known about its pathogenesis. Experimental models have implicated tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in induction of bone-marrow suppression and eythrophagocytosis. Conversely, interleukin 10 (IL-10), which mediates feed-back regulation of TNF, stimulates bone-marrow function in vitro and counteracts anaemia in mice. We investigated the associations of these cytokines with malarial anaemia. METHODS: We enrolled 175 African children with malaria into two studies in 1995 and 1996. In the first study, children were classified as having severe anaemia (n=10), uncomplicated malaria (n=26), or cerebral anaemia (n=41). In the second study, patients were classified as having cerebral malaria (n=33) or being fully conscious (n=65), and the two groups were subdivided by measured haemoglobin as normal (>110 g/L), moderate anaemia (60-90 g/L), and severe anaemia (<50 g/L). IL-10 and TNF concentrations were measured by ELISA in plasma samples from all patients. FINDINGS: IL-10 concentrations were significantly lower in patients with severe anaemia than in all other groups. In 1995, geometric mean plasma IL-10 in patients with severe anaemia was 270 pg/mL (95% CI 152-482) compared with 725 pg/mL (465-1129) in uncomplicated malaria and 966 pg/mL (612-1526) in cerebral malaria (p<0.03). In 1996, fully conscious patients with severe anaemia also had significantly lower IL-10 concentrations than all other groups, including cerebral-malaria patients with severe anaemia and all patients with moderate anaemia (p<0.001). In both studies, TNF concentrations were significantly higher in cerebral malaria than in fully conscious patients (p<0.01). By contrast, the ratio of TNF to IL-10 was significantly higher in fully conscious patients with severe anaemia than in all other groups (p<0.001). INTERPRETATION: Our findings identify severe malarial anaemia as a distinct disorder in which insufficient IL-10 response to high TNF concentrations may have a central role.

AB - BACKGROUND: Severe anaemia is a major complication of malaria but little is known about its pathogenesis. Experimental models have implicated tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in induction of bone-marrow suppression and eythrophagocytosis. Conversely, interleukin 10 (IL-10), which mediates feed-back regulation of TNF, stimulates bone-marrow function in vitro and counteracts anaemia in mice. We investigated the associations of these cytokines with malarial anaemia. METHODS: We enrolled 175 African children with malaria into two studies in 1995 and 1996. In the first study, children were classified as having severe anaemia (n=10), uncomplicated malaria (n=26), or cerebral anaemia (n=41). In the second study, patients were classified as having cerebral malaria (n=33) or being fully conscious (n=65), and the two groups were subdivided by measured haemoglobin as normal (>110 g/L), moderate anaemia (60-90 g/L), and severe anaemia (<50 g/L). IL-10 and TNF concentrations were measured by ELISA in plasma samples from all patients. FINDINGS: IL-10 concentrations were significantly lower in patients with severe anaemia than in all other groups. In 1995, geometric mean plasma IL-10 in patients with severe anaemia was 270 pg/mL (95% CI 152-482) compared with 725 pg/mL (465-1129) in uncomplicated malaria and 966 pg/mL (612-1526) in cerebral malaria (p<0.03). In 1996, fully conscious patients with severe anaemia also had significantly lower IL-10 concentrations than all other groups, including cerebral-malaria patients with severe anaemia and all patients with moderate anaemia (p<0.001). In both studies, TNF concentrations were significantly higher in cerebral malaria than in fully conscious patients (p<0.01). By contrast, the ratio of TNF to IL-10 was significantly higher in fully conscious patients with severe anaemia than in all other groups (p<0.001). INTERPRETATION: Our findings identify severe malarial anaemia as a distinct disorder in which insufficient IL-10 response to high TNF concentrations may have a central role.

U2 - 10.1016/S0140-6736(97)09439-7

DO - 10.1016/S0140-6736(97)09439-7

M3 - Journal article

VL - 351

SP - 1768

EP - 1772

JO - Lancet

JF - Lancet

SN - 0140-6736

IS - 9118

ER -

ID: 6748110