Increase in clinically recorded type 2 diabetes after colectomy

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Increase in clinically recorded type 2 diabetes after colectomy. / Jensen, Anders B; Sørensen, Thorkild Ia; Pedersen, Oluf; Jess, Tine; Brunak, Søren; Allin, Kristine H.

In: eLife, Vol. 7, e37420, 2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Jensen, AB, Sørensen, TI, Pedersen, O, Jess, T, Brunak, S & Allin, KH 2018, 'Increase in clinically recorded type 2 diabetes after colectomy', eLife, vol. 7, e37420. https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.37420

APA

Jensen, A. B., Sørensen, T. I., Pedersen, O., Jess, T., Brunak, S., & Allin, K. H. (2018). Increase in clinically recorded type 2 diabetes after colectomy. eLife, 7, [e37420]. https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.37420

Vancouver

Jensen AB, Sørensen TI, Pedersen O, Jess T, Brunak S, Allin KH. Increase in clinically recorded type 2 diabetes after colectomy. eLife. 2018;7. e37420. https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.37420

Author

Jensen, Anders B ; Sørensen, Thorkild Ia ; Pedersen, Oluf ; Jess, Tine ; Brunak, Søren ; Allin, Kristine H. / Increase in clinically recorded type 2 diabetes after colectomy. In: eLife. 2018 ; Vol. 7.

Bibtex

@article{b87d8a562cdf4f8cb91d7cdc0ba2c991,
title = "Increase in clinically recorded type 2 diabetes after colectomy",
abstract = "The colon hosts gut microbes and glucagon-like peptide 1 secreting cells, both of which influence glucose homeostasis. We tested whether colectomy is associated with development of type 2 diabetes. Using nationwide register data, we identified patients who had undergone total colectomy, partial colectomy, or proctectomy. For each colectomy patient, we selected 15 non-colectomy patients who had undergone other surgeries. Compared with non-colectomy patients, patients with total colectomy (n = 3,793) had a hazard ratio (HR) of clinically recorded type 2 diabetes of 1.40 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 1.62; p<0.001). Corresponding HRs after right hemicolectomy (n = 10,989), left hemicolectomy (n = 2,513), and sigmoidectomy (n = 13,927) were 1.08 (95{\%} CI, 0.99 to 1.19; p=0.10), 1.41 (95{\%} CI, 1.19 to 1.67; p<0.001) and 1.30 (95{\%} CI, 1.21 to 1.40; p<0.001), respectively. Although we were not able to adjust for several potential confounders, our findings suggest that the left colon may contribute to maintenance of glucose homeostasis.",
author = "Jensen, {Anders B} and S{\o}rensen, {Thorkild Ia} and Oluf Pedersen and Tine Jess and S{\o}ren Brunak and Allin, {Kristine H}",
note = "{\circledC} 2018, Jensen et al.",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.7554/eLife.37420",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
journal = "eLife",
issn = "2050-084X",
publisher = "eLife Sciences Publications Ltd.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increase in clinically recorded type 2 diabetes after colectomy

AU - Jensen, Anders B

AU - Sørensen, Thorkild Ia

AU - Pedersen, Oluf

AU - Jess, Tine

AU - Brunak, Søren

AU - Allin, Kristine H

N1 - © 2018, Jensen et al.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - The colon hosts gut microbes and glucagon-like peptide 1 secreting cells, both of which influence glucose homeostasis. We tested whether colectomy is associated with development of type 2 diabetes. Using nationwide register data, we identified patients who had undergone total colectomy, partial colectomy, or proctectomy. For each colectomy patient, we selected 15 non-colectomy patients who had undergone other surgeries. Compared with non-colectomy patients, patients with total colectomy (n = 3,793) had a hazard ratio (HR) of clinically recorded type 2 diabetes of 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 1.62; p<0.001). Corresponding HRs after right hemicolectomy (n = 10,989), left hemicolectomy (n = 2,513), and sigmoidectomy (n = 13,927) were 1.08 (95% CI, 0.99 to 1.19; p=0.10), 1.41 (95% CI, 1.19 to 1.67; p<0.001) and 1.30 (95% CI, 1.21 to 1.40; p<0.001), respectively. Although we were not able to adjust for several potential confounders, our findings suggest that the left colon may contribute to maintenance of glucose homeostasis.

AB - The colon hosts gut microbes and glucagon-like peptide 1 secreting cells, both of which influence glucose homeostasis. We tested whether colectomy is associated with development of type 2 diabetes. Using nationwide register data, we identified patients who had undergone total colectomy, partial colectomy, or proctectomy. For each colectomy patient, we selected 15 non-colectomy patients who had undergone other surgeries. Compared with non-colectomy patients, patients with total colectomy (n = 3,793) had a hazard ratio (HR) of clinically recorded type 2 diabetes of 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 1.62; p<0.001). Corresponding HRs after right hemicolectomy (n = 10,989), left hemicolectomy (n = 2,513), and sigmoidectomy (n = 13,927) were 1.08 (95% CI, 0.99 to 1.19; p=0.10), 1.41 (95% CI, 1.19 to 1.67; p<0.001) and 1.30 (95% CI, 1.21 to 1.40; p<0.001), respectively. Although we were not able to adjust for several potential confounders, our findings suggest that the left colon may contribute to maintenance of glucose homeostasis.

U2 - 10.7554/eLife.37420

DO - 10.7554/eLife.37420

M3 - Journal article

VL - 7

JO - eLife

JF - eLife

SN - 2050-084X

M1 - e37420

ER -

ID: 204344307