Is high vitamin B12 status a cause of lung cancer?

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Is high vitamin B12 status a cause of lung cancer? / on behalf of the LC3 consortium and the TRICL consortium.

In: International Journal of Cancer, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

on behalf of the LC3 consortium and the TRICL consortium 2019, 'Is high vitamin B12 status a cause of lung cancer?', International Journal of Cancer. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32033

APA

on behalf of the LC3 consortium and the TRICL consortium (2019). Is high vitamin B12 status a cause of lung cancer? International Journal of Cancer. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32033

Vancouver

on behalf of the LC3 consortium and the TRICL consortium. Is high vitamin B12 status a cause of lung cancer? International Journal of Cancer. 2019. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32033

Author

on behalf of the LC3 consortium and the TRICL consortium. / Is high vitamin B12 status a cause of lung cancer?. In: International Journal of Cancer. 2019.

Bibtex

@article{d3d30059f296456cba3bac0a3c8d2a81,
title = "Is high vitamin B12 status a cause of lung cancer?",
abstract = "Vitamin B supplementation can have side effects for human health, including cancer risk. We aimed to elucidate the role of vitamin B12 in lung cancer etiology via direct measurements of pre-diagnostic circulating vitamin B12 concentrations in a nested case–control study, complemented with a Mendelian randomization (MR) approach in an independent case–control sample. We used pre-diagnostic biomarker data from 5183 case–control pairs nested within 20 prospective cohorts, and genetic data from 29,266 cases and 56,450 controls. Exposures included directly measured circulating vitamin B12 in pre-diagnostic blood samples from the nested case–control study, and 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with vitamin B12 concentrations in the MR study. Our main outcome of interest was increased risk for lung cancer, overall and by histological subtype, per increase in circulating vitamin B12 concentrations. We found circulating vitamin B12 to be positively associated with overall lung cancer risk in a dose response fashion (odds ratio for a doubling in B12 [OR log2B12 ] = 1.15, 95{\%} confidence interval (95{\%}CI) = 1.06–1.25). The MR analysis based on 8 genetic variants also indicated that genetically determined higher vitamin B12 concentrations were positively associated with overall lung cancer risk (OR per 150 pmol/L standard deviation increase in B12 [OR SD ] = 1.08, 95{\%}CI = 1.00–1.16). Considering the consistency of these two independent and complementary analyses, these findings support the hypothesis that high vitamin B12 status increases the risk of lung cancer.",
author = "Anouar Fanidi and Robert Carreras-Torres and Larose, {Tricia L.} and Yuan, {Jian Min} and Stevens, {Victoria L.} and Weinstein, {Stephanie J.} and Demetrius Albanes and Ross Prentice and Mary Pettinger and Qiuyin Cai and Blot, {William J.} and Arslan, {Alan A.} and Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte and McCullough, {Marjorie L.} and {Le Marchand}, Loic and Wilkens, {Lynne R.} and Haiman, {Christopher A.} and Xuehong Zhang and Stampfer, {Meir J.} and Smith-Warner, {Stephanie A.} and Edward Giovannucci and Giles, {Graham G.} and Hodge, {Allison M.} and Gianluca Severi and Mikael Johansson and Kjell Grankvist and Arnulf Langhammer and Brumpton, {Ben M.} and Renwei Wang and Gao, {Yu Tang} and Ulrika Ericson and Bojesen, {Stig E.} and Arnold, {Susanne M.} and Koh, {Woon Puay} and Shu, {Xiao Ou} and Xiang, {Yong Bing} and Honglan Li and Wei Zheng and Qing Lan and Kala Visvanathan and Judith Hoffman-Bolton and Ueland, {Per M.} and {\O}ivind Midttun and Caporaso, {Neil E.} and Mark Purdue and Freedman, {Neal D.} and Buring, {Julie E.} and Lee, {I. Min} and Sesso, {Howard D.} and {Michael Gaziano}, J. and {on behalf of the LC3 consortium and the TRICL consortium}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1002/ijc.32033",
language = "English",
journal = "International Journal of Cancer",
issn = "0020-7136",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons, Inc.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is high vitamin B12 status a cause of lung cancer?

AU - Fanidi, Anouar

AU - Carreras-Torres, Robert

AU - Larose, Tricia L.

AU - Yuan, Jian Min

AU - Stevens, Victoria L.

AU - Weinstein, Stephanie J.

AU - Albanes, Demetrius

AU - Prentice, Ross

AU - Pettinger, Mary

AU - Cai, Qiuyin

AU - Blot, William J.

AU - Arslan, Alan A.

AU - Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne

AU - McCullough, Marjorie L.

AU - Le Marchand, Loic

AU - Wilkens, Lynne R.

AU - Haiman, Christopher A.

AU - Zhang, Xuehong

AU - Stampfer, Meir J.

AU - Smith-Warner, Stephanie A.

AU - Giovannucci, Edward

AU - Giles, Graham G.

AU - Hodge, Allison M.

AU - Severi, Gianluca

AU - Johansson, Mikael

AU - Grankvist, Kjell

AU - Langhammer, Arnulf

AU - Brumpton, Ben M.

AU - Wang, Renwei

AU - Gao, Yu Tang

AU - Ericson, Ulrika

AU - Bojesen, Stig E.

AU - Arnold, Susanne M.

AU - Koh, Woon Puay

AU - Shu, Xiao Ou

AU - Xiang, Yong Bing

AU - Li, Honglan

AU - Zheng, Wei

AU - Lan, Qing

AU - Visvanathan, Kala

AU - Hoffman-Bolton, Judith

AU - Ueland, Per M.

AU - Midttun, Øivind

AU - Caporaso, Neil E.

AU - Purdue, Mark

AU - Freedman, Neal D.

AU - Buring, Julie E.

AU - Lee, I. Min

AU - Sesso, Howard D.

AU - Michael Gaziano, J.

AU - on behalf of the LC3 consortium and the TRICL consortium

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Vitamin B supplementation can have side effects for human health, including cancer risk. We aimed to elucidate the role of vitamin B12 in lung cancer etiology via direct measurements of pre-diagnostic circulating vitamin B12 concentrations in a nested case–control study, complemented with a Mendelian randomization (MR) approach in an independent case–control sample. We used pre-diagnostic biomarker data from 5183 case–control pairs nested within 20 prospective cohorts, and genetic data from 29,266 cases and 56,450 controls. Exposures included directly measured circulating vitamin B12 in pre-diagnostic blood samples from the nested case–control study, and 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with vitamin B12 concentrations in the MR study. Our main outcome of interest was increased risk for lung cancer, overall and by histological subtype, per increase in circulating vitamin B12 concentrations. We found circulating vitamin B12 to be positively associated with overall lung cancer risk in a dose response fashion (odds ratio for a doubling in B12 [OR log2B12 ] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval (95%CI) = 1.06–1.25). The MR analysis based on 8 genetic variants also indicated that genetically determined higher vitamin B12 concentrations were positively associated with overall lung cancer risk (OR per 150 pmol/L standard deviation increase in B12 [OR SD ] = 1.08, 95%CI = 1.00–1.16). Considering the consistency of these two independent and complementary analyses, these findings support the hypothesis that high vitamin B12 status increases the risk of lung cancer.

AB - Vitamin B supplementation can have side effects for human health, including cancer risk. We aimed to elucidate the role of vitamin B12 in lung cancer etiology via direct measurements of pre-diagnostic circulating vitamin B12 concentrations in a nested case–control study, complemented with a Mendelian randomization (MR) approach in an independent case–control sample. We used pre-diagnostic biomarker data from 5183 case–control pairs nested within 20 prospective cohorts, and genetic data from 29,266 cases and 56,450 controls. Exposures included directly measured circulating vitamin B12 in pre-diagnostic blood samples from the nested case–control study, and 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with vitamin B12 concentrations in the MR study. Our main outcome of interest was increased risk for lung cancer, overall and by histological subtype, per increase in circulating vitamin B12 concentrations. We found circulating vitamin B12 to be positively associated with overall lung cancer risk in a dose response fashion (odds ratio for a doubling in B12 [OR log2B12 ] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval (95%CI) = 1.06–1.25). The MR analysis based on 8 genetic variants also indicated that genetically determined higher vitamin B12 concentrations were positively associated with overall lung cancer risk (OR per 150 pmol/L standard deviation increase in B12 [OR SD ] = 1.08, 95%CI = 1.00–1.16). Considering the consistency of these two independent and complementary analyses, these findings support the hypothesis that high vitamin B12 status increases the risk of lung cancer.

U2 - 10.1002/ijc.32033

DO - 10.1002/ijc.32033

M3 - Journal article

JO - International Journal of Cancer

JF - International Journal of Cancer

SN - 0020-7136

ER -

ID: 218769095