Imposing legality: hegemony and resistance under the EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance, and Trade (FLEGT)

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Imposing legality : hegemony and resistance under the EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance, and Trade (FLEGT). / Myers, Rodd; Rutt, Rebecca Leigh; McDermott, Constance; Maryudi, Ahmad ; Acheampong, Emmanuel ; Câm, Hoàng.

In: Journal of Political Ecology, Vol. 27, No. 1, 2020, p. 125-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Myers, R, Rutt, RL, McDermott, C, Maryudi, A, Acheampong, E & Câm, H 2020, 'Imposing legality: hegemony and resistance under the EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance, and Trade (FLEGT)', Journal of Political Ecology, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 125-149. https://doi.org/10.2458/v27i1.23208

APA

Myers, R., Rutt, R. L., McDermott, C., Maryudi, A., Acheampong, E., & Câm, H. (2020). Imposing legality: hegemony and resistance under the EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance, and Trade (FLEGT). Journal of Political Ecology, 27(1), 125-149. https://doi.org/10.2458/v27i1.23208

Vancouver

Myers R, Rutt RL, McDermott C, Maryudi A, Acheampong E, Câm H. Imposing legality: hegemony and resistance under the EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance, and Trade (FLEGT). Journal of Political Ecology. 2020;27(1):125-149. https://doi.org/10.2458/v27i1.23208

Author

Myers, Rodd ; Rutt, Rebecca Leigh ; McDermott, Constance ; Maryudi, Ahmad ; Acheampong, Emmanuel ; Câm, Hoàng. / Imposing legality : hegemony and resistance under the EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance, and Trade (FLEGT). In: Journal of Political Ecology. 2020 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 125-149.

Bibtex

@article{ad055a5fb9284361b450e993c9fc4d80,
title = "Imposing legality: hegemony and resistance under the EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance, and Trade (FLEGT)",
abstract = "Timber legality trade restrictions and verification are a bundle of contemporary mechanisms triggered by global concerns about forest degradation and deforestation. The European Union Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade initiative is a significant effort to not only screen out illegal timber and wood products from the EU, but also support trading partner countries to improve their legality definitions and verification processes. But by using bilateral agreements (Voluntary Partnership Agreements) as a key mechanism, the EU legitimizes trade partner nation-states as the authority to decide what is legal. We engage in a theoretical debate about the complexities of the meaning of legality, and then analyze empirical data collected from interviews in Ghana, Indonesia, Vietnam and Europe with policy, civil society and industry actors to understand how different actors understand legality. We find hegemonic notions of Westphalian statehood at the core of 'global'notions of legality and often contrast with local understandings of legality. Non-state actors understand these hegemonic notions of legality as imposed upon them and part of a colonial legacy. Further, notions of legality that fail to conform with hegemonic understandings are readily framed by nation-states as immoral or criminal. We emphasize the importance of understanding these framings to elucidate the embedded assumptions about what comprises legality within assemblages of global actors.",
author = "Rodd Myers and Rutt, {Rebecca Leigh} and Constance McDermott and Ahmad Maryudi and Emmanuel Acheampong and Ho{\`a}ng C{\^a}m",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.2458/v27i1.23208",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "125--149",
journal = "Journal of Political Ecology",
issn = "1073-0451",
publisher = "University of Arizona",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Imposing legality

T2 - hegemony and resistance under the EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance, and Trade (FLEGT)

AU - Myers, Rodd

AU - Rutt, Rebecca Leigh

AU - McDermott, Constance

AU - Maryudi, Ahmad

AU - Acheampong, Emmanuel

AU - Câm, Hoàng

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Timber legality trade restrictions and verification are a bundle of contemporary mechanisms triggered by global concerns about forest degradation and deforestation. The European Union Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade initiative is a significant effort to not only screen out illegal timber and wood products from the EU, but also support trading partner countries to improve their legality definitions and verification processes. But by using bilateral agreements (Voluntary Partnership Agreements) as a key mechanism, the EU legitimizes trade partner nation-states as the authority to decide what is legal. We engage in a theoretical debate about the complexities of the meaning of legality, and then analyze empirical data collected from interviews in Ghana, Indonesia, Vietnam and Europe with policy, civil society and industry actors to understand how different actors understand legality. We find hegemonic notions of Westphalian statehood at the core of 'global'notions of legality and often contrast with local understandings of legality. Non-state actors understand these hegemonic notions of legality as imposed upon them and part of a colonial legacy. Further, notions of legality that fail to conform with hegemonic understandings are readily framed by nation-states as immoral or criminal. We emphasize the importance of understanding these framings to elucidate the embedded assumptions about what comprises legality within assemblages of global actors.

AB - Timber legality trade restrictions and verification are a bundle of contemporary mechanisms triggered by global concerns about forest degradation and deforestation. The European Union Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade initiative is a significant effort to not only screen out illegal timber and wood products from the EU, but also support trading partner countries to improve their legality definitions and verification processes. But by using bilateral agreements (Voluntary Partnership Agreements) as a key mechanism, the EU legitimizes trade partner nation-states as the authority to decide what is legal. We engage in a theoretical debate about the complexities of the meaning of legality, and then analyze empirical data collected from interviews in Ghana, Indonesia, Vietnam and Europe with policy, civil society and industry actors to understand how different actors understand legality. We find hegemonic notions of Westphalian statehood at the core of 'global'notions of legality and often contrast with local understandings of legality. Non-state actors understand these hegemonic notions of legality as imposed upon them and part of a colonial legacy. Further, notions of legality that fail to conform with hegemonic understandings are readily framed by nation-states as immoral or criminal. We emphasize the importance of understanding these framings to elucidate the embedded assumptions about what comprises legality within assemblages of global actors.

U2 - 10.2458/v27i1.23208

DO - 10.2458/v27i1.23208

M3 - Journal article

VL - 27

SP - 125

EP - 149

JO - Journal of Political Ecology

JF - Journal of Political Ecology

SN - 1073-0451

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 238629639