Association of influenza infection with hospitalisation-related systemic lupus erythematosus flares: a time series analysis

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Association of influenza infection with hospitalisation-related systemic lupus erythematosus flares : a time series analysis. / Joo, Young Bin; Lim, Youn-Hee; Kim, Ki-Jo; Park, Kyung-Su; Park, Yune-Jung.

In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, 2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Joo, YB, Lim, Y-H, Kim, K-J, Park, K-S & Park, Y-J 2021, 'Association of influenza infection with hospitalisation-related systemic lupus erythematosus flares: a time series analysis', Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology.

APA

Joo, Y. B., Lim, Y-H., Kim, K-J., Park, K-S., & Park, Y-J. (2021). Association of influenza infection with hospitalisation-related systemic lupus erythematosus flares: a time series analysis. Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology.

Vancouver

Joo YB, Lim Y-H, Kim K-J, Park K-S, Park Y-J. Association of influenza infection with hospitalisation-related systemic lupus erythematosus flares: a time series analysis. Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology. 2021.

Author

Joo, Young Bin ; Lim, Youn-Hee ; Kim, Ki-Jo ; Park, Kyung-Su ; Park, Yune-Jung. / Association of influenza infection with hospitalisation-related systemic lupus erythematosus flares : a time series analysis. In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology. 2021.

Bibtex

@article{465eed700015465f83b95e0e0338cdca,
title = "Association of influenza infection with hospitalisation-related systemic lupus erythematosus flares: a time series analysis",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate whether the influenza annual outbreak in Korea is related to hospitalisation-related flares in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients.METHODS: The weekly frequency of hospitalisation-related SLE flares (2012-2015) was collected from the Korean National Health Insurance claim database. The weekly laboratory-confirmed detection rate of influenza infection was obtained from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention database. A generalised linear model was used to examine the relative risks (RRs) of hospitalisation-related SLE flares associated with influenza infection, after adjusting for time trends and meteorological data.RESULTS: A total of 2,223 hospitalisation-related SLE flares were analysed. An interquartile range (24.5{\%}) increase in influenza infection was associated with a 14.0{\%} increase in hospitalisation-related SLE flares (RR, 1.14; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 1.04-1.25; p=0.006). In addition, influenza infections at lag 0-1 (over 2 weeks including concurrent and 1 previous week) and lag 0-2 (over 3 weeks including concurrent and 2 previous weeks) were associated with increase in hospitalisation-related SLE flares (RR, 1.14; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.26; p=0.014 and RR, 1.13; 95{\%} CI: 1.02-1.26; p=0.023). Significant associations were especially observed in women (RR, 1.15; 95{\%} CI: 1.15-1.16; p=0.006) and immunosuppressant (RR, 1.26; 95{\%} CI: 1.26-1.27; p<0.001) or glucocorticoid recipients (RR, 1.17, 95{\%} CI: 1.16-1.17; p=0.004).CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a significant association between seasonal influenza infection and flares in SLE patients, which suggests influenza can be a novel environmental risk factor for SLE flares.",
author = "Joo, {Young Bin} and Youn-Hee Lim and Ki-Jo Kim and Kyung-Su Park and Yune-Jung Park",
year = "2021",
language = "English",
journal = "Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology",
issn = "0392-856X",
publisher = "Pacini Editore SpA",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of influenza infection with hospitalisation-related systemic lupus erythematosus flares

T2 - a time series analysis

AU - Joo, Young Bin

AU - Lim, Youn-Hee

AU - Kim, Ki-Jo

AU - Park, Kyung-Su

AU - Park, Yune-Jung

PY - 2021

Y1 - 2021

N2 - OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate whether the influenza annual outbreak in Korea is related to hospitalisation-related flares in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients.METHODS: The weekly frequency of hospitalisation-related SLE flares (2012-2015) was collected from the Korean National Health Insurance claim database. The weekly laboratory-confirmed detection rate of influenza infection was obtained from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention database. A generalised linear model was used to examine the relative risks (RRs) of hospitalisation-related SLE flares associated with influenza infection, after adjusting for time trends and meteorological data.RESULTS: A total of 2,223 hospitalisation-related SLE flares were analysed. An interquartile range (24.5%) increase in influenza infection was associated with a 14.0% increase in hospitalisation-related SLE flares (RR, 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04-1.25; p=0.006). In addition, influenza infections at lag 0-1 (over 2 weeks including concurrent and 1 previous week) and lag 0-2 (over 3 weeks including concurrent and 2 previous weeks) were associated with increase in hospitalisation-related SLE flares (RR, 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.26; p=0.014 and RR, 1.13; 95% CI: 1.02-1.26; p=0.023). Significant associations were especially observed in women (RR, 1.15; 95% CI: 1.15-1.16; p=0.006) and immunosuppressant (RR, 1.26; 95% CI: 1.26-1.27; p<0.001) or glucocorticoid recipients (RR, 1.17, 95% CI: 1.16-1.17; p=0.004).CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a significant association between seasonal influenza infection and flares in SLE patients, which suggests influenza can be a novel environmental risk factor for SLE flares.

AB - OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate whether the influenza annual outbreak in Korea is related to hospitalisation-related flares in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients.METHODS: The weekly frequency of hospitalisation-related SLE flares (2012-2015) was collected from the Korean National Health Insurance claim database. The weekly laboratory-confirmed detection rate of influenza infection was obtained from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention database. A generalised linear model was used to examine the relative risks (RRs) of hospitalisation-related SLE flares associated with influenza infection, after adjusting for time trends and meteorological data.RESULTS: A total of 2,223 hospitalisation-related SLE flares were analysed. An interquartile range (24.5%) increase in influenza infection was associated with a 14.0% increase in hospitalisation-related SLE flares (RR, 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04-1.25; p=0.006). In addition, influenza infections at lag 0-1 (over 2 weeks including concurrent and 1 previous week) and lag 0-2 (over 3 weeks including concurrent and 2 previous weeks) were associated with increase in hospitalisation-related SLE flares (RR, 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.26; p=0.014 and RR, 1.13; 95% CI: 1.02-1.26; p=0.023). Significant associations were especially observed in women (RR, 1.15; 95% CI: 1.15-1.16; p=0.006) and immunosuppressant (RR, 1.26; 95% CI: 1.26-1.27; p<0.001) or glucocorticoid recipients (RR, 1.17, 95% CI: 1.16-1.17; p=0.004).CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a significant association between seasonal influenza infection and flares in SLE patients, which suggests influenza can be a novel environmental risk factor for SLE flares.

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33124567

JO - Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology

JF - Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology

SN - 0392-856X

ER -

ID: 251456070