Socio-economic characteristics and the effect of taxation as a health policy instrument

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Socio-economic characteristics and the effect of taxation as a health policy instrument. / Smed, Sinne; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård; Denver, Sigrid.

In: Food Policy, Vol. 32, No. 5-6, 2007, p. 624-639.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Smed, S, Jensen, JD & Denver, S 2007, 'Socio-economic characteristics and the effect of taxation as a health policy instrument', Food Policy, vol. 32, no. 5-6, pp. 624-639. https://doi.org/doi:10.1016/j.foodpol.2007.03.002

APA

Smed, S., Jensen, J. D., & Denver, S. (2007). Socio-economic characteristics and the effect of taxation as a health policy instrument. Food Policy, 32(5-6), 624-639. https://doi.org/doi:10.1016/j.foodpol.2007.03.002

Vancouver

Smed S, Jensen JD, Denver S. Socio-economic characteristics and the effect of taxation as a health policy instrument. Food Policy. 2007;32(5-6):624-639. https://doi.org/doi:10.1016/j.foodpol.2007.03.002

Author

Smed, Sinne ; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård ; Denver, Sigrid. / Socio-economic characteristics and the effect of taxation as a health policy instrument. In: Food Policy. 2007 ; Vol. 32, No. 5-6. pp. 624-639.

Bibtex

@article{ea7079b0a1c211ddb6ae000ea68e967b,
title = "Socio-economic characteristics and the effect of taxation as a health policy instrument",
abstract = "This paper analyses the quantitative effects of using economic instruments in health policy on thebasis of price elasticities calculated from estimated demand systems. The nutritional effects of varioustaxation schemes are compared for households in different age groups and social classes. Focusingon the consumption of saturated fats, fibre and sugar; it is generally found that the impact of priceinstruments is stronger for lower social classes than in other groups of the population. With regardto age groups, it is mostly the youngest that decrease their demand for saturated fat in response toprice changes, while it is mostly the middle-aged who exhibit price responsiveness in their demandfor sugar. These groups are however not considered as key target groups for dietary regulation; thustax instruments may be effective in improving diets on average, but the design of the instruments andthe targeting of vulnerable groups with special needs should be done with care. It should be notedthat a tax on a single nutrient or food may have undesired effects on the demand for other food components,though this may be avoided by introducing taxes/subsidies on several food productssimultaneously. ",
keywords = "Former LIFE faculty, Nutrition, Food taxes, AIDS model, Socio-demographic",
author = "Sinne Smed and Jensen, {J{\o}rgen Dejg{\aa}rd} and Sigrid Denver",
year = "2007",
doi = "doi:10.1016/j.foodpol.2007.03.002",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "624--639",
journal = "Food Policy",
issn = "0306-9192",
publisher = "Pergamon Press",
number = "5-6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Socio-economic characteristics and the effect of taxation as a health policy instrument

AU - Smed, Sinne

AU - Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård

AU - Denver, Sigrid

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - This paper analyses the quantitative effects of using economic instruments in health policy on thebasis of price elasticities calculated from estimated demand systems. The nutritional effects of varioustaxation schemes are compared for households in different age groups and social classes. Focusingon the consumption of saturated fats, fibre and sugar; it is generally found that the impact of priceinstruments is stronger for lower social classes than in other groups of the population. With regardto age groups, it is mostly the youngest that decrease their demand for saturated fat in response toprice changes, while it is mostly the middle-aged who exhibit price responsiveness in their demandfor sugar. These groups are however not considered as key target groups for dietary regulation; thustax instruments may be effective in improving diets on average, but the design of the instruments andthe targeting of vulnerable groups with special needs should be done with care. It should be notedthat a tax on a single nutrient or food may have undesired effects on the demand for other food components,though this may be avoided by introducing taxes/subsidies on several food productssimultaneously.

AB - This paper analyses the quantitative effects of using economic instruments in health policy on thebasis of price elasticities calculated from estimated demand systems. The nutritional effects of varioustaxation schemes are compared for households in different age groups and social classes. Focusingon the consumption of saturated fats, fibre and sugar; it is generally found that the impact of priceinstruments is stronger for lower social classes than in other groups of the population. With regardto age groups, it is mostly the youngest that decrease their demand for saturated fat in response toprice changes, while it is mostly the middle-aged who exhibit price responsiveness in their demandfor sugar. These groups are however not considered as key target groups for dietary regulation; thustax instruments may be effective in improving diets on average, but the design of the instruments andthe targeting of vulnerable groups with special needs should be done with care. It should be notedthat a tax on a single nutrient or food may have undesired effects on the demand for other food components,though this may be avoided by introducing taxes/subsidies on several food productssimultaneously.

KW - Former LIFE faculty

KW - Nutrition

KW - Food taxes

KW - AIDS model

KW - Socio-demographic

U2 - doi:10.1016/j.foodpol.2007.03.002

DO - doi:10.1016/j.foodpol.2007.03.002

M3 - Journal article

VL - 32

SP - 624

EP - 639

JO - Food Policy

JF - Food Policy

SN - 0306-9192

IS - 5-6

ER -

ID: 8082343