SMELL SPACE: Mapping out the olfactory design space for novel interactions

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

SMELL SPACE : Mapping out the olfactory design space for novel interactions. / Maggioni, Emanuela; Cobden, Robert; Dmitrenko, Dmitrijs; Hornbæk, Kasper; Obrist, Marianna.

In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, Vol. 27, No. 5, 36, 2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Maggioni, E, Cobden, R, Dmitrenko, D, Hornbæk, K & Obrist, M 2020, 'SMELL SPACE: Mapping out the olfactory design space for novel interactions', ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, vol. 27, no. 5, 36. https://doi.org/10.1145/3402449

APA

Maggioni, E., Cobden, R., Dmitrenko, D., Hornbæk, K., & Obrist, M. (2020). SMELL SPACE: Mapping out the olfactory design space for novel interactions. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 27(5), [36]. https://doi.org/10.1145/3402449

Vancouver

Maggioni E, Cobden R, Dmitrenko D, Hornbæk K, Obrist M. SMELL SPACE: Mapping out the olfactory design space for novel interactions. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction. 2020;27(5). 36. https://doi.org/10.1145/3402449

Author

Maggioni, Emanuela ; Cobden, Robert ; Dmitrenko, Dmitrijs ; Hornbæk, Kasper ; Obrist, Marianna. / SMELL SPACE : Mapping out the olfactory design space for novel interactions. In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction. 2020 ; Vol. 27, No. 5.

Bibtex

@article{6405e1b8c5a24c6eba018f68196d7c6b,
title = "SMELL SPACE: Mapping out the olfactory design space for novel interactions",
abstract = "The human sense of smell is powerful. However, the way we use smell as an interaction modality in human-computer interaction (HCI) is limited. We lack a common reference point to guide designers' choices when using smell. Here, we map out an olfactory design space to provide designers with such guidance. We identified four key design features: (i) chemical, (ii) emotional, (iii) spatial, and (iv) temporal. Each feature defines a building block for smell-based interaction design and is grounded in a review of the relevant scientific literature. We then demonstrate the design opportunities in three application cases. Each application (i.e., one desktop, two virtual reality implementations) highlights the design choices alongside the implementation and evaluation possibilities in using smell. We conclude by discussing how identifying those design features facilitates a healthy growth of this research domain and contributes to an intermediate-level knowledge space. Finally, we discuss further challenges the HCI community needs to tackle. ",
keywords = "chemical sense, novel interactions, odour interfaces, olfactory design space, scent-based interaction design, Smell, smell-based applications, virtual reality applications",
author = "Emanuela Maggioni and Robert Cobden and Dmitrijs Dmitrenko and Kasper Hornb{\ae}k and Marianna Obrist",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1145/3402449",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
journal = "A C M Transactions on Computer - Human Interaction",
issn = "1073-0516",
publisher = "Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - SMELL SPACE

T2 - Mapping out the olfactory design space for novel interactions

AU - Maggioni, Emanuela

AU - Cobden, Robert

AU - Dmitrenko, Dmitrijs

AU - Hornbæk, Kasper

AU - Obrist, Marianna

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - The human sense of smell is powerful. However, the way we use smell as an interaction modality in human-computer interaction (HCI) is limited. We lack a common reference point to guide designers' choices when using smell. Here, we map out an olfactory design space to provide designers with such guidance. We identified four key design features: (i) chemical, (ii) emotional, (iii) spatial, and (iv) temporal. Each feature defines a building block for smell-based interaction design and is grounded in a review of the relevant scientific literature. We then demonstrate the design opportunities in three application cases. Each application (i.e., one desktop, two virtual reality implementations) highlights the design choices alongside the implementation and evaluation possibilities in using smell. We conclude by discussing how identifying those design features facilitates a healthy growth of this research domain and contributes to an intermediate-level knowledge space. Finally, we discuss further challenges the HCI community needs to tackle.

AB - The human sense of smell is powerful. However, the way we use smell as an interaction modality in human-computer interaction (HCI) is limited. We lack a common reference point to guide designers' choices when using smell. Here, we map out an olfactory design space to provide designers with such guidance. We identified four key design features: (i) chemical, (ii) emotional, (iii) spatial, and (iv) temporal. Each feature defines a building block for smell-based interaction design and is grounded in a review of the relevant scientific literature. We then demonstrate the design opportunities in three application cases. Each application (i.e., one desktop, two virtual reality implementations) highlights the design choices alongside the implementation and evaluation possibilities in using smell. We conclude by discussing how identifying those design features facilitates a healthy growth of this research domain and contributes to an intermediate-level knowledge space. Finally, we discuss further challenges the HCI community needs to tackle.

KW - chemical sense

KW - novel interactions

KW - odour interfaces

KW - olfactory design space

KW - scent-based interaction design

KW - Smell

KW - smell-based applications

KW - virtual reality applications

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85092383173&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1145/3402449

DO - 10.1145/3402449

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:85092383173

VL - 27

JO - A C M Transactions on Computer - Human Interaction

JF - A C M Transactions on Computer - Human Interaction

SN - 1073-0516

IS - 5

M1 - 36

ER -

ID: 250380469