Mitophagy and Alzheimer's Disease: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms

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Mitophagy and Alzheimer's Disease : Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms. / Kerr, Jesse S.; Adriaanse, Bryan A.; Greig, Nigel H.; Mattson, Mark P.; Cader, M. Zameel; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Fang, Evandro F.

In: Trends in Neurosciences, Vol. 40, No. 3, 2017, p. 151-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Kerr, JS, Adriaanse, BA, Greig, NH, Mattson, MP, Cader, MZ, Bohr, VA & Fang, EF 2017, 'Mitophagy and Alzheimer's Disease: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms', Trends in Neurosciences, vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 151-166. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tins.2017.01.002

APA

Kerr, J. S., Adriaanse, B. A., Greig, N. H., Mattson, M. P., Cader, M. Z., Bohr, V. A., & Fang, E. F. (2017). Mitophagy and Alzheimer's Disease: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms. Trends in Neurosciences, 40(3), 151-166. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tins.2017.01.002

Vancouver

Kerr JS, Adriaanse BA, Greig NH, Mattson MP, Cader MZ, Bohr VA et al. Mitophagy and Alzheimer's Disease: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms. Trends in Neurosciences. 2017;40(3):151-166. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tins.2017.01.002

Author

Kerr, Jesse S. ; Adriaanse, Bryan A. ; Greig, Nigel H. ; Mattson, Mark P. ; Cader, M. Zameel ; Bohr, Vilhelm A. ; Fang, Evandro F. / Mitophagy and Alzheimer's Disease : Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms. In: Trends in Neurosciences. 2017 ; Vol. 40, No. 3. pp. 151-166.

Bibtex

@article{9f6591eef487407f82a4815ddea42177,
title = "Mitophagy and Alzheimer's Disease: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms",
abstract = "Neurons affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) experience mitochondrial dysfunction and a bioenergetic deficit that occurs early and promotes the disease-defining amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) and Tau pathologies. Emerging findings suggest that the autophagy/lysosome pathway that removes damaged mitochondria (mitophagy) is also compromised in AD, resulting in the accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria. Results in animal and cellular models of AD and in patients with sporadic late-onset AD suggest that impaired mitophagy contributes to synaptic dysfunction and cognitive deficits by triggering Aβ and Tau accumulation through increases in oxidative damage and cellular energy deficits; these, in turn, impair mitophagy. Interventions that bolster mitochondrial health and/or stimulate mitophagy may therefore forestall the neurodegenerative process in AD.",
author = "Kerr, {Jesse S.} and Adriaanse, {Bryan A.} and Greig, {Nigel H.} and Mattson, {Mark P.} and Cader, {M. Zameel} and Bohr, {Vilhelm A.} and Fang, {Evandro F.}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.tins.2017.01.002",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "151--166",
journal = "Trends in Neurosciences",
issn = "0166-2236",
publisher = "Elsevier Ltd. * Trends Journals",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mitophagy and Alzheimer's Disease

T2 - Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms

AU - Kerr, Jesse S.

AU - Adriaanse, Bryan A.

AU - Greig, Nigel H.

AU - Mattson, Mark P.

AU - Cader, M. Zameel

AU - Bohr, Vilhelm A.

AU - Fang, Evandro F.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Neurons affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) experience mitochondrial dysfunction and a bioenergetic deficit that occurs early and promotes the disease-defining amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) and Tau pathologies. Emerging findings suggest that the autophagy/lysosome pathway that removes damaged mitochondria (mitophagy) is also compromised in AD, resulting in the accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria. Results in animal and cellular models of AD and in patients with sporadic late-onset AD suggest that impaired mitophagy contributes to synaptic dysfunction and cognitive deficits by triggering Aβ and Tau accumulation through increases in oxidative damage and cellular energy deficits; these, in turn, impair mitophagy. Interventions that bolster mitochondrial health and/or stimulate mitophagy may therefore forestall the neurodegenerative process in AD.

AB - Neurons affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) experience mitochondrial dysfunction and a bioenergetic deficit that occurs early and promotes the disease-defining amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) and Tau pathologies. Emerging findings suggest that the autophagy/lysosome pathway that removes damaged mitochondria (mitophagy) is also compromised in AD, resulting in the accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria. Results in animal and cellular models of AD and in patients with sporadic late-onset AD suggest that impaired mitophagy contributes to synaptic dysfunction and cognitive deficits by triggering Aβ and Tau accumulation through increases in oxidative damage and cellular energy deficits; these, in turn, impair mitophagy. Interventions that bolster mitochondrial health and/or stimulate mitophagy may therefore forestall the neurodegenerative process in AD.

U2 - 10.1016/j.tins.2017.01.002

DO - 10.1016/j.tins.2017.01.002

M3 - Review

C2 - 28190529

AN - SCOPUS:85012907718

VL - 40

SP - 151

EP - 166

JO - Trends in Neurosciences

JF - Trends in Neurosciences

SN - 0166-2236

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 188451689