Mesenteric Lymphadenitis and Terminal Ileitis is Associated With Yersinia Infection: A Meta-analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Mesenteric Lymphadenitis and Terminal Ileitis is Associated With Yersinia Infection : A Meta-analysis. / Fonnes, Siv; Rasmussen, Tilde; Brunchmann, Amanda; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane; Rosenberg, Jacob.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 270, 02.2022, p. 12-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Fonnes, S, Rasmussen, T, Brunchmann, A, Holzknecht, BJ & Rosenberg, J 2022, 'Mesenteric Lymphadenitis and Terminal Ileitis is Associated With Yersinia Infection: A Meta-analysis', Journal of Surgical Research, vol. 270, pp. 12-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2021.08.027

APA

Fonnes, S., Rasmussen, T., Brunchmann, A., Holzknecht, B. J., & Rosenberg, J. (2022). Mesenteric Lymphadenitis and Terminal Ileitis is Associated With Yersinia Infection: A Meta-analysis. Journal of Surgical Research, 270, 12-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2021.08.027

Vancouver

Fonnes S, Rasmussen T, Brunchmann A, Holzknecht BJ, Rosenberg J. Mesenteric Lymphadenitis and Terminal Ileitis is Associated With Yersinia Infection: A Meta-analysis. Journal of Surgical Research. 2022 Feb;270:12-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2021.08.027

Author

Fonnes, Siv ; Rasmussen, Tilde ; Brunchmann, Amanda ; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane ; Rosenberg, Jacob. / Mesenteric Lymphadenitis and Terminal Ileitis is Associated With Yersinia Infection : A Meta-analysis. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2022 ; Vol. 270. pp. 12-21.

Bibtex

@article{f1f283467bc04efc9520fc7d2c00ea47,
title = "Mesenteric Lymphadenitis and Terminal Ileitis is Associated With Yersinia Infection: A Meta-analysis",
abstract = "Background: Yersinia infection affects terminal ileum and lymph nodes and could therefore mimic the symptoms of appendicitis. We aimed to systematically characterise the suspected or confirmed abdominal diseases and/or surgeries associated with Yersinia infection. Materials and methods: This systematic review and meta-analysis was reported following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. A protocol (CRD42016053252) was uploaded to PROSPERO. The searches were conducted in PubMed and EMBASE on October 2, 2020. Original reports on patients with abdominal surgical diseases were included. The primary outcome was to characterise suspected or confirmed abdominal surgical diseases and/or surgeries associated with Yersinia infection, while the secondary outcomes were the positive rate of Yersinia species for each disease and surgery, and to investigate the rate of Yersinia spp. in different geographic regions. We calculated the weighted mean prevalence of positive tests for Yersinia spp. for the different diseases and surgeries according to the detection method and for subgroups based on geographic region. Results: From the search, 33 studies were included in the systematic review and 18 in the meta-analysis. Across geographic regions, the weighted mean prevalence for Yersinia spp. was 51% (95% CI 34%-69%) in mesenteric lymphadenitis, 65% (95% CI 45%-85%) in terminal ileitis, and 8% (95% CI 2%-15%) in normal appendices. Conclusions: Around half of the patients with mesenteric lymphadenitis and terminal ileitis were serologically positive for infections with Yersinia spp. Yersinia infection may cause unnecessary surgery for suspected appendicitis due to symptoms from mesenteric lymphadenitis or terminal ileitis. (c) 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Mesenteric lymphadenitis, Ileitis, Appendectomy, Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Appendicitis, ENTEROCOLITICA INFECTION, APPENDICITIS, PSEUDOTUBERCULOSIS",
author = "Siv Fonnes and Tilde Rasmussen and Amanda Brunchmann and Holzknecht, {Barbara Juliane} and Jacob Rosenberg",
year = "2022",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1016/j.jss.2021.08.027",
language = "English",
volume = "270",
pages = "12--21",
journal = "Journal of Surgical Research",
issn = "0022-4804",
publisher = "Academic Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mesenteric Lymphadenitis and Terminal Ileitis is Associated With Yersinia Infection

T2 - A Meta-analysis

AU - Fonnes, Siv

AU - Rasmussen, Tilde

AU - Brunchmann, Amanda

AU - Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane

AU - Rosenberg, Jacob

PY - 2022/2

Y1 - 2022/2

N2 - Background: Yersinia infection affects terminal ileum and lymph nodes and could therefore mimic the symptoms of appendicitis. We aimed to systematically characterise the suspected or confirmed abdominal diseases and/or surgeries associated with Yersinia infection. Materials and methods: This systematic review and meta-analysis was reported following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. A protocol (CRD42016053252) was uploaded to PROSPERO. The searches were conducted in PubMed and EMBASE on October 2, 2020. Original reports on patients with abdominal surgical diseases were included. The primary outcome was to characterise suspected or confirmed abdominal surgical diseases and/or surgeries associated with Yersinia infection, while the secondary outcomes were the positive rate of Yersinia species for each disease and surgery, and to investigate the rate of Yersinia spp. in different geographic regions. We calculated the weighted mean prevalence of positive tests for Yersinia spp. for the different diseases and surgeries according to the detection method and for subgroups based on geographic region. Results: From the search, 33 studies were included in the systematic review and 18 in the meta-analysis. Across geographic regions, the weighted mean prevalence for Yersinia spp. was 51% (95% CI 34%-69%) in mesenteric lymphadenitis, 65% (95% CI 45%-85%) in terminal ileitis, and 8% (95% CI 2%-15%) in normal appendices. Conclusions: Around half of the patients with mesenteric lymphadenitis and terminal ileitis were serologically positive for infections with Yersinia spp. Yersinia infection may cause unnecessary surgery for suspected appendicitis due to symptoms from mesenteric lymphadenitis or terminal ileitis. (c) 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

AB - Background: Yersinia infection affects terminal ileum and lymph nodes and could therefore mimic the symptoms of appendicitis. We aimed to systematically characterise the suspected or confirmed abdominal diseases and/or surgeries associated with Yersinia infection. Materials and methods: This systematic review and meta-analysis was reported following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. A protocol (CRD42016053252) was uploaded to PROSPERO. The searches were conducted in PubMed and EMBASE on October 2, 2020. Original reports on patients with abdominal surgical diseases were included. The primary outcome was to characterise suspected or confirmed abdominal surgical diseases and/or surgeries associated with Yersinia infection, while the secondary outcomes were the positive rate of Yersinia species for each disease and surgery, and to investigate the rate of Yersinia spp. in different geographic regions. We calculated the weighted mean prevalence of positive tests for Yersinia spp. for the different diseases and surgeries according to the detection method and for subgroups based on geographic region. Results: From the search, 33 studies were included in the systematic review and 18 in the meta-analysis. Across geographic regions, the weighted mean prevalence for Yersinia spp. was 51% (95% CI 34%-69%) in mesenteric lymphadenitis, 65% (95% CI 45%-85%) in terminal ileitis, and 8% (95% CI 2%-15%) in normal appendices. Conclusions: Around half of the patients with mesenteric lymphadenitis and terminal ileitis were serologically positive for infections with Yersinia spp. Yersinia infection may cause unnecessary surgery for suspected appendicitis due to symptoms from mesenteric lymphadenitis or terminal ileitis. (c) 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KW - Mesenteric lymphadenitis

KW - Ileitis

KW - Appendectomy

KW - Yersinia enterocolitica

KW - Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

KW - Appendicitis

KW - ENTEROCOLITICA INFECTION

KW - APPENDICITIS

KW - PSEUDOTUBERCULOSIS

U2 - 10.1016/j.jss.2021.08.027

DO - 10.1016/j.jss.2021.08.027

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34628159

VL - 270

SP - 12

EP - 21

JO - Journal of Surgical Research

JF - Journal of Surgical Research

SN - 0022-4804

ER -

ID: 314068855