Long-term effects of psychosocial factors of home and work on biomarkers of stress

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Long-term effects of psychosocial factors of home and work on biomarkers of stress. / Eller, Nanna Hurwitz; Kristiansen, Jesper; Hansen, Åse Marie.

In: International Journal of Psychophysiology, Vol. 79, No. 2, 2011, p. 195-202.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Eller, NH, Kristiansen, J & Hansen, ÅM 2011, 'Long-term effects of psychosocial factors of home and work on biomarkers of stress', International Journal of Psychophysiology, vol. 79, no. 2, pp. 195-202. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2010.10.009

APA

Eller, N. H., Kristiansen, J., & Hansen, Å. M. (2011). Long-term effects of psychosocial factors of home and work on biomarkers of stress. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 79(2), 195-202. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2010.10.009

Vancouver

Eller NH, Kristiansen J, Hansen ÅM. Long-term effects of psychosocial factors of home and work on biomarkers of stress. International Journal of Psychophysiology. 2011;79(2):195-202. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2010.10.009

Author

Eller, Nanna Hurwitz ; Kristiansen, Jesper ; Hansen, Åse Marie. / Long-term effects of psychosocial factors of home and work on biomarkers of stress. In: International Journal of Psychophysiology. 2011 ; Vol. 79, No. 2. pp. 195-202.

Bibtex

@article{799eb126a8ff48c3862f693ef3f311ed,
title = "Long-term effects of psychosocial factors of home and work on biomarkers of stress",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: The current study analyzed the relationship between psychosocial factors measured at baseline and heart rate variability (HRV) and salivary cortisol measured at baseline and again, six years later. METHODS: In 2002 and 2008, measurements of HRV and salivary cortisol at three time points were obtained from 70 healthy participants (48 women and 22 men). The associations between the psychosocial factors measured in 2002 and the dependent variables, HRV and salivary cortisol measured in 2002 and 2008, were examined using a series of repeated measures ANCOVAs. The dependent variables were as follows: the logarithmically transformed levels of total power (LnTP), high frequency power (LnHF), the ratio between low and high frequency power (LnLF/HF) and salivary cortisol (LnCortisol). RESULTS: For women, high social status was associated with high LnTP, high LnHF, and low LnLF/HF. In work, lack of control was associated with low LnTP, and lack of support was associated with an increased LnLF/HF ratio. For men, high social status was associated with low LnTP, low LnHF and high LnCortisol. Greater number of hours spent doing housework was associated with both low LnLF/HF and low LnCortisol, whereas a large imbalance between effort and reward was associated with low LnTP and high LnCortisol. CONCLUSION: Despite the small sample size, this study demonstrated that psychosocial factors impact levels of activity in the allostatic systems",
keywords = "Adult, Analysis of Variance, Autonomic Nervous System, Biological Markers, Blood Pressure, Electrocardiography, Female, Heart Rate, Humans, Hydrocortisone, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Psychology, Saliva, Sex Factors, Social Environment, Statistics as Topic, Stress, Psychological",
author = "Eller, {Nanna Hurwitz} and Jesper Kristiansen and Hansen, {{\AA}se Marie}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2010.10.009",
language = "English",
volume = "79",
pages = "195--202",
journal = "International Journal of Psychophysiology",
issn = "0167-8760",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term effects of psychosocial factors of home and work on biomarkers of stress

AU - Eller, Nanna Hurwitz

AU - Kristiansen, Jesper

AU - Hansen, Åse Marie

N1 - Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - INTRODUCTION: The current study analyzed the relationship between psychosocial factors measured at baseline and heart rate variability (HRV) and salivary cortisol measured at baseline and again, six years later. METHODS: In 2002 and 2008, measurements of HRV and salivary cortisol at three time points were obtained from 70 healthy participants (48 women and 22 men). The associations between the psychosocial factors measured in 2002 and the dependent variables, HRV and salivary cortisol measured in 2002 and 2008, were examined using a series of repeated measures ANCOVAs. The dependent variables were as follows: the logarithmically transformed levels of total power (LnTP), high frequency power (LnHF), the ratio between low and high frequency power (LnLF/HF) and salivary cortisol (LnCortisol). RESULTS: For women, high social status was associated with high LnTP, high LnHF, and low LnLF/HF. In work, lack of control was associated with low LnTP, and lack of support was associated with an increased LnLF/HF ratio. For men, high social status was associated with low LnTP, low LnHF and high LnCortisol. Greater number of hours spent doing housework was associated with both low LnLF/HF and low LnCortisol, whereas a large imbalance between effort and reward was associated with low LnTP and high LnCortisol. CONCLUSION: Despite the small sample size, this study demonstrated that psychosocial factors impact levels of activity in the allostatic systems

AB - INTRODUCTION: The current study analyzed the relationship between psychosocial factors measured at baseline and heart rate variability (HRV) and salivary cortisol measured at baseline and again, six years later. METHODS: In 2002 and 2008, measurements of HRV and salivary cortisol at three time points were obtained from 70 healthy participants (48 women and 22 men). The associations between the psychosocial factors measured in 2002 and the dependent variables, HRV and salivary cortisol measured in 2002 and 2008, were examined using a series of repeated measures ANCOVAs. The dependent variables were as follows: the logarithmically transformed levels of total power (LnTP), high frequency power (LnHF), the ratio between low and high frequency power (LnLF/HF) and salivary cortisol (LnCortisol). RESULTS: For women, high social status was associated with high LnTP, high LnHF, and low LnLF/HF. In work, lack of control was associated with low LnTP, and lack of support was associated with an increased LnLF/HF ratio. For men, high social status was associated with low LnTP, low LnHF and high LnCortisol. Greater number of hours spent doing housework was associated with both low LnLF/HF and low LnCortisol, whereas a large imbalance between effort and reward was associated with low LnTP and high LnCortisol. CONCLUSION: Despite the small sample size, this study demonstrated that psychosocial factors impact levels of activity in the allostatic systems

KW - Adult

KW - Analysis of Variance

KW - Autonomic Nervous System

KW - Biological Markers

KW - Blood Pressure

KW - Electrocardiography

KW - Female

KW - Heart Rate

KW - Humans

KW - Hydrocortisone

KW - Longitudinal Studies

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Psychology

KW - Saliva

KW - Sex Factors

KW - Social Environment

KW - Statistics as Topic

KW - Stress, Psychological

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2010.10.009

DO - 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2010.10.009

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 21034783

VL - 79

SP - 195

EP - 202

JO - International Journal of Psychophysiology

JF - International Journal of Psychophysiology

SN - 0167-8760

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 37473411