How low can you go? Spatial frequency sensitivity in pure alexia

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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How low can you go? Spatial frequency sensitivity in pure alexia. / Starrfelt, Randi; Nielsen, Simon; Habekost, Thomas; Andersen, Tobias S.

In: Brain and Language, Vol. 126, No. 2, 2013, p. 188-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Starrfelt, R, Nielsen, S, Habekost, T & Andersen, TS 2013, 'How low can you go? Spatial frequency sensitivity in pure alexia', Brain and Language, vol. 126, no. 2, pp. 188-192. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2013.05.006

APA

Starrfelt, R., Nielsen, S., Habekost, T., & Andersen, T. S. (2013). How low can you go? Spatial frequency sensitivity in pure alexia. Brain and Language, 126(2), 188-192. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2013.05.006

Vancouver

Starrfelt R, Nielsen S, Habekost T, Andersen TS. How low can you go? Spatial frequency sensitivity in pure alexia. Brain and Language. 2013;126(2):188-192. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2013.05.006

Author

Starrfelt, Randi ; Nielsen, Simon ; Habekost, Thomas ; Andersen, Tobias S. / How low can you go? Spatial frequency sensitivity in pure alexia. In: Brain and Language. 2013 ; Vol. 126, No. 2. pp. 188-192.

Bibtex

@article{7fae4c095cf94e5797db5f4c3229e714,
title = "How low can you go?: Spatial frequency sensitivity in pure alexia",
abstract = "Pure alexia is a selective deficit in reading, following lesions to the posterior left hemisphere. Writing and other language functions remain intact in these patients. Whether pure alexia is caused by a primary problem in visual perception is highly debated. A recent hypothesis suggests that a low level deficit - reduced sensitivity to particular spatial frequencies – is the underlying cause. We tested this hypothesis in a pure alexic patient (LK), using a sensitive psychophysical paradigm to examine her performance with simple patterns of different spatial frequency. We find that both in a detection and a classification task, LK’s contrast sensitivity is comparable to normal controls for all spatial frequencies. Thus, reduced spatial frequency sensitivity does not constitute a general explanation for pure alexia, suggesting that the core deficit in this disorder is at a higher level in the visual processing stream.",
author = "Randi Starrfelt and Simon Nielsen and Thomas Habekost and Andersen, {Tobias S.}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1016/j.bandl.2013.05.006",
language = "English",
volume = "126",
pages = "188--192",
journal = "Brain and Language",
issn = "0093-934X",
publisher = "Academic Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - How low can you go?

T2 - Spatial frequency sensitivity in pure alexia

AU - Starrfelt, Randi

AU - Nielsen, Simon

AU - Habekost, Thomas

AU - Andersen, Tobias S.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Pure alexia is a selective deficit in reading, following lesions to the posterior left hemisphere. Writing and other language functions remain intact in these patients. Whether pure alexia is caused by a primary problem in visual perception is highly debated. A recent hypothesis suggests that a low level deficit - reduced sensitivity to particular spatial frequencies – is the underlying cause. We tested this hypothesis in a pure alexic patient (LK), using a sensitive psychophysical paradigm to examine her performance with simple patterns of different spatial frequency. We find that both in a detection and a classification task, LK’s contrast sensitivity is comparable to normal controls for all spatial frequencies. Thus, reduced spatial frequency sensitivity does not constitute a general explanation for pure alexia, suggesting that the core deficit in this disorder is at a higher level in the visual processing stream.

AB - Pure alexia is a selective deficit in reading, following lesions to the posterior left hemisphere. Writing and other language functions remain intact in these patients. Whether pure alexia is caused by a primary problem in visual perception is highly debated. A recent hypothesis suggests that a low level deficit - reduced sensitivity to particular spatial frequencies – is the underlying cause. We tested this hypothesis in a pure alexic patient (LK), using a sensitive psychophysical paradigm to examine her performance with simple patterns of different spatial frequency. We find that both in a detection and a classification task, LK’s contrast sensitivity is comparable to normal controls for all spatial frequencies. Thus, reduced spatial frequency sensitivity does not constitute a general explanation for pure alexia, suggesting that the core deficit in this disorder is at a higher level in the visual processing stream.

U2 - 10.1016/j.bandl.2013.05.006

DO - 10.1016/j.bandl.2013.05.006

M3 - Journal article

VL - 126

SP - 188

EP - 192

JO - Brain and Language

JF - Brain and Language

SN - 0093-934X

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 45816853