Heat inactivation of foot-and-mouth disease virus, swine vesicular disease virus and classical swine fever virus when air-dried on plastic and glass surfaces

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) and classical swine fever virus (CSFV) all cause important animal diseases. FMDV affects many different cloven-hoofed animals, whereas SVDV and CSFV are restricted to domestic and feral pigs together with wild boar. Europe is normally free of these diseases, but occasionally outbreaks happen, which can cause huge economic losses. Handling of these viruses, in particular FMDV and CSFV, is only allowed within high containment laboratories and stables. Periodically such facilities need to be decommissioned for repair or closing down, which is done by cleaning and chemical disinfection, followed by fumigation due to residual risk from virus on surfaces in inaccessible places. However, building materials in older laboratories or stables that have housed infected animals may not be well-suited for fumigation. Heat treatment is another way of inactivating viruses. In this study, we have determined the survival of infectivity in air-dried virus samples on glass and plastic surfaces incubated at room temperature or heated to 70 °C for 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 days. Each of the tested viruses was inactivated to below the limit of detection after 24 or 48 h of incubation at 70 °C; in contrast, some of these viruses were still infectious after 7 days of incubation at room temperature. This study provides important information that can be used in relation to decontamination of buildings and in risk-assessments.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBiosafety and Health
Volume3
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)217-223
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Chinese Medical Association Publishing House

    Research areas

  • Decontamination, Pestivirus, Picornavirus, Risk-assessment, Virus survival

ID: 276902171