Abdominal pain caused by Enterobius vermicularis: A case report

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Standard

Abdominal pain caused by Enterobius vermicularis : A case report. / Nielsen, O. H.; Krasilnikoff, P. A.

In: Current Therapeutic Research - Clinical and Experimental, Vol. 37, No. 4, 01.01.1985, p. 779-783.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Nielsen, OH & Krasilnikoff, PA 1985, 'Abdominal pain caused by Enterobius vermicularis: A case report', Current Therapeutic Research - Clinical and Experimental, vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 779-783.

APA

Nielsen, O. H., & Krasilnikoff, P. A. (1985). Abdominal pain caused by Enterobius vermicularis: A case report. Current Therapeutic Research - Clinical and Experimental, 37(4), 779-783.

Vancouver

Nielsen OH, Krasilnikoff PA. Abdominal pain caused by Enterobius vermicularis: A case report. Current Therapeutic Research - Clinical and Experimental. 1985 Jan 1;37(4):779-783.

Author

Nielsen, O. H. ; Krasilnikoff, P. A. / Abdominal pain caused by Enterobius vermicularis : A case report. In: Current Therapeutic Research - Clinical and Experimental. 1985 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 779-783.

Bibtex

@article{cdf629e09f9d4934a4153960bb058c80,
title = "Abdominal pain caused by Enterobius vermicularis: A case report",
abstract = "Infestation with Enterobius vermicularis is the most frequent worm infection in man. As the infestation is seldom manifested otherwise than by pruritus ani, we want to describe a case where the disease picture was quite different and presented rare clinical symptoms without pruritus ani. In a 13-year-old boy with increasing tenderness at McBurney's point, appendectomy was performed. Except for elevated total IgE and blood eosinophil count, no abnormal values were demonstrated, and all relevant tests were negative. The histopathological examination showed the appendiceal lumen filled with feces containing Enterobius vermicularis. An anal cellophane test performed five weeks later revealed no pinworm ova.",
author = "Nielsen, {O. H.} and Krasilnikoff, {P. A.}",
year = "1985",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "779--783",
journal = "Current Therapeutic Research",
issn = "0011-393X",
publisher = "Excerpta Medica, Inc.",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Abdominal pain caused by Enterobius vermicularis

T2 - A case report

AU - Nielsen, O. H.

AU - Krasilnikoff, P. A.

PY - 1985/1/1

Y1 - 1985/1/1

N2 - Infestation with Enterobius vermicularis is the most frequent worm infection in man. As the infestation is seldom manifested otherwise than by pruritus ani, we want to describe a case where the disease picture was quite different and presented rare clinical symptoms without pruritus ani. In a 13-year-old boy with increasing tenderness at McBurney's point, appendectomy was performed. Except for elevated total IgE and blood eosinophil count, no abnormal values were demonstrated, and all relevant tests were negative. The histopathological examination showed the appendiceal lumen filled with feces containing Enterobius vermicularis. An anal cellophane test performed five weeks later revealed no pinworm ova.

AB - Infestation with Enterobius vermicularis is the most frequent worm infection in man. As the infestation is seldom manifested otherwise than by pruritus ani, we want to describe a case where the disease picture was quite different and presented rare clinical symptoms without pruritus ani. In a 13-year-old boy with increasing tenderness at McBurney's point, appendectomy was performed. Except for elevated total IgE and blood eosinophil count, no abnormal values were demonstrated, and all relevant tests were negative. The histopathological examination showed the appendiceal lumen filled with feces containing Enterobius vermicularis. An anal cellophane test performed five weeks later revealed no pinworm ova.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0021800884&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:0021800884

VL - 37

SP - 779

EP - 783

JO - Current Therapeutic Research

JF - Current Therapeutic Research

SN - 0011-393X

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 227079984