Dietary non-esterified oleic Acid decreases the jejunal levels of anorectic N-acylethanolamines

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Dietary non-esterified oleic Acid decreases the jejunal levels of anorectic N-acylethanolamines. / Diep, Thi Ai; Madsen, Andreas N; Krogh-Hansen, Sandra; Al-Shahwani, Marwa; Al-Sabagh, Laila; Holst, Birgitte; Hansen, Harald S.

In: PloS one, Vol. 9, No. 6, e100365, 2014, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Diep, TA, Madsen, AN, Krogh-Hansen, S, Al-Shahwani, M, Al-Sabagh, L, Holst, B & Hansen, HS 2014, 'Dietary non-esterified oleic Acid decreases the jejunal levels of anorectic N-acylethanolamines', PloS one, vol. 9, no. 6, e100365, pp. 1-7. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0100365

APA

Diep, T. A., Madsen, A. N., Krogh-Hansen, S., Al-Shahwani, M., Al-Sabagh, L., Holst, B., & Hansen, H. S. (2014). Dietary non-esterified oleic Acid decreases the jejunal levels of anorectic N-acylethanolamines. PloS one, 9(6), 1-7. [e100365]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0100365

Vancouver

Diep TA, Madsen AN, Krogh-Hansen S, Al-Shahwani M, Al-Sabagh L, Holst B et al. Dietary non-esterified oleic Acid decreases the jejunal levels of anorectic N-acylethanolamines. PloS one. 2014;9(6):1-7. e100365. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0100365

Author

Diep, Thi Ai ; Madsen, Andreas N ; Krogh-Hansen, Sandra ; Al-Shahwani, Marwa ; Al-Sabagh, Laila ; Holst, Birgitte ; Hansen, Harald S. / Dietary non-esterified oleic Acid decreases the jejunal levels of anorectic N-acylethanolamines. In: PloS one. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 6. pp. 1-7.

Bibtex

@article{7a5fc9e35a9f4dc5aa01405520d2f615,
title = "Dietary non-esterified oleic Acid decreases the jejunal levels of anorectic N-acylethanolamines",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Oleoylethanolamide and several other N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), e.g. linoleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide, have anorectic properties in rats, and prolonged intake of a high-fat diet decreases the levels of the anorectic NAEs in jejunum. Jejunal anorectic NAEs are thought to add to the control of food intake via activation of PPARalpha and the vagus nerve. The fat-induced decrease may explain part of the hyperphagic effect of high-fat diets. In the present study, we investigated 1) whether the reduced levels of anorectic NAEs were reversible in rats, 2) whether mice respond to dietary fat (olive oil) by reducing levels of anorectic NAEs, and 3) whether dietary non-esterified oleic acid also can decrease levels of anorectic NAEs in mice. We are searching for the fat sensor in the intestine, which mediates the decreased levels of anorectic NAEs.METHODS: Male rats and mice were fed diets high (45 energy{\%} fat) in either triacylglycerol or free fatty acids for 7-14 days, and jejunal NAE and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE) levels were determined by liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry.RESULTS: In rats, reduced levels of anorectic NAEs could be reversed after 3 days from changing the diet from high-fat to chow. Corresponding NAPE levels tended to show the same changes. In mice, jejunal levels of anorectic NAEs were also reduced when fed a high-fat diet. In addition, we found that non-esterified oleic acid were also able to reduce levels of anorectic NAEs in mice.CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the down-regulation of the jejunal level of anorectic NAEs by dietary fat is not restricted to rats, and that the fatty acid component oleic acid, in dietary olive oil may be sufficient to mediate this regulation. Thus, a fatty acid sensor may mediate this effect of dietary fat.",
keywords = "Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences",
author = "Diep, {Thi Ai} and Madsen, {Andreas N} and Sandra Krogh-Hansen and Marwa Al-Shahwani and Laila Al-Sabagh and Birgitte Holst and Hansen, {Harald S.}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0100365",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "1--7",
journal = "P L o S One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary non-esterified oleic Acid decreases the jejunal levels of anorectic N-acylethanolamines

AU - Diep, Thi Ai

AU - Madsen, Andreas N

AU - Krogh-Hansen, Sandra

AU - Al-Shahwani, Marwa

AU - Al-Sabagh, Laila

AU - Holst, Birgitte

AU - Hansen, Harald S.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Oleoylethanolamide and several other N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), e.g. linoleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide, have anorectic properties in rats, and prolonged intake of a high-fat diet decreases the levels of the anorectic NAEs in jejunum. Jejunal anorectic NAEs are thought to add to the control of food intake via activation of PPARalpha and the vagus nerve. The fat-induced decrease may explain part of the hyperphagic effect of high-fat diets. In the present study, we investigated 1) whether the reduced levels of anorectic NAEs were reversible in rats, 2) whether mice respond to dietary fat (olive oil) by reducing levels of anorectic NAEs, and 3) whether dietary non-esterified oleic acid also can decrease levels of anorectic NAEs in mice. We are searching for the fat sensor in the intestine, which mediates the decreased levels of anorectic NAEs.METHODS: Male rats and mice were fed diets high (45 energy% fat) in either triacylglycerol or free fatty acids for 7-14 days, and jejunal NAE and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE) levels were determined by liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry.RESULTS: In rats, reduced levels of anorectic NAEs could be reversed after 3 days from changing the diet from high-fat to chow. Corresponding NAPE levels tended to show the same changes. In mice, jejunal levels of anorectic NAEs were also reduced when fed a high-fat diet. In addition, we found that non-esterified oleic acid were also able to reduce levels of anorectic NAEs in mice.CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the down-regulation of the jejunal level of anorectic NAEs by dietary fat is not restricted to rats, and that the fatty acid component oleic acid, in dietary olive oil may be sufficient to mediate this regulation. Thus, a fatty acid sensor may mediate this effect of dietary fat.

AB - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Oleoylethanolamide and several other N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), e.g. linoleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide, have anorectic properties in rats, and prolonged intake of a high-fat diet decreases the levels of the anorectic NAEs in jejunum. Jejunal anorectic NAEs are thought to add to the control of food intake via activation of PPARalpha and the vagus nerve. The fat-induced decrease may explain part of the hyperphagic effect of high-fat diets. In the present study, we investigated 1) whether the reduced levels of anorectic NAEs were reversible in rats, 2) whether mice respond to dietary fat (olive oil) by reducing levels of anorectic NAEs, and 3) whether dietary non-esterified oleic acid also can decrease levels of anorectic NAEs in mice. We are searching for the fat sensor in the intestine, which mediates the decreased levels of anorectic NAEs.METHODS: Male rats and mice were fed diets high (45 energy% fat) in either triacylglycerol or free fatty acids for 7-14 days, and jejunal NAE and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE) levels were determined by liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry.RESULTS: In rats, reduced levels of anorectic NAEs could be reversed after 3 days from changing the diet from high-fat to chow. Corresponding NAPE levels tended to show the same changes. In mice, jejunal levels of anorectic NAEs were also reduced when fed a high-fat diet. In addition, we found that non-esterified oleic acid were also able to reduce levels of anorectic NAEs in mice.CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the down-regulation of the jejunal level of anorectic NAEs by dietary fat is not restricted to rats, and that the fatty acid component oleic acid, in dietary olive oil may be sufficient to mediate this regulation. Thus, a fatty acid sensor may mediate this effect of dietary fat.

KW - Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0100365

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0100365

M3 - Journal article

VL - 9

SP - 1

EP - 7

JO - P L o S One

JF - P L o S One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 6

M1 - e100365

ER -

ID: 119651571