Two missense mutations in KCNQ1 cause pituitary hormone deficiency and maternally inherited gingival fibromatosis

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Johanna Tommiska, Johanna Känsäkoski, Lasse Skibsbye, Kirsi Vaaralahti, Xiaonan Liu, Emily J Lodge, Chuyi Tang, Lei Yuan, Rainer Fagerholm, Jørgen K Kanters, Päivi Lahermo, Mari Kaunisto, Riikka Keski-Filppula, Sanna Vuoristo, Kristiina Pulli, Tapani Ebeling, Leena Valanne, Eeva-Marja Sankila, Sirpa Kivirikko, Mitja Lääperi & 15 others Filippo Casoni, Paolo Giacobini, Franziska Phan-Hug, Tal Buki, Manuel Tena-Sempere, Nelly Pitteloud, Riitta Veijola, Marita Lipsanen-Nyman, Kari Kaunisto, Patrice Mollard, Cynthia L Andoniadou, Joel A Hirsch, Markku Varjosalo, Thomas Jespersen, Taneli Raivio

Familial growth hormone deficiency provides an opportunity to identify new genetic causes of short stature. Here we combine linkage analysis with whole-genome resequencing in patients with growth hormone deficiency and maternally inherited gingival fibromatosis. We report that patients from three unrelated families harbor either of two missense mutations, c.347G>T p.(Arg116Leu) or c.1106C>T p.(Pro369Leu), in KCNQ1, a gene previously implicated in the long QT interval syndrome. Kcnq1 is expressed in hypothalamic GHRH neurons and pituitary somatotropes. Co-expressing KCNQ1 with the KCNE2 β-subunit shows that both KCNQ1 mutants increase current levels in patch clamp analyses and are associated with reduced pituitary hormone secretion from AtT-20 cells. In conclusion, our results reveal a role for the KCNQ1 potassium channel in the regulation of human growth, and show that growth hormone deficiency associated with maternally inherited gingival fibromatosis is an allelic disorder with cardiac arrhythmia syndromes caused by KCNQ1 mutations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1289
JournalNature Communications
Volume8
Issue number1
Number of pages11
ISSN2041-1723
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Nov 2017

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