High intake of regular-fat cheese compared with reduced-fat cheese does not affect LDL cholesterol or risk markers of the metabolic syndrome: a randomized controlled trial

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

High intake of regular-fat cheese compared with reduced-fat cheese does not affect LDL cholesterol or risk markers of the metabolic syndrome : a randomized controlled trial. / Raziani, Farinaz; Tholstrup, Tine; Kristensen, Marlene Dahlwad; Svanegaard, Matilde L; Ritz, Christian; Astrup, Arne; Raben, Anne.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 104, No. 4, 2016, p. 973-981.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Raziani, F, Tholstrup, T, Kristensen, MD, Svanegaard, ML, Ritz, C, Astrup, A & Raben, A 2016, 'High intake of regular-fat cheese compared with reduced-fat cheese does not affect LDL cholesterol or risk markers of the metabolic syndrome: a randomized controlled trial', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 104, no. 4, pp. 973-981. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.134932

APA

Raziani, F., Tholstrup, T., Kristensen, M. D., Svanegaard, M. L., Ritz, C., Astrup, A., & Raben, A. (2016). High intake of regular-fat cheese compared with reduced-fat cheese does not affect LDL cholesterol or risk markers of the metabolic syndrome: a randomized controlled trial. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 104(4), 973-981. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.134932

Vancouver

Raziani F, Tholstrup T, Kristensen MD, Svanegaard ML, Ritz C, Astrup A et al. High intake of regular-fat cheese compared with reduced-fat cheese does not affect LDL cholesterol or risk markers of the metabolic syndrome: a randomized controlled trial. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2016;104(4):973-981. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.134932

Author

Raziani, Farinaz ; Tholstrup, Tine ; Kristensen, Marlene Dahlwad ; Svanegaard, Matilde L ; Ritz, Christian ; Astrup, Arne ; Raben, Anne. / High intake of regular-fat cheese compared with reduced-fat cheese does not affect LDL cholesterol or risk markers of the metabolic syndrome : a randomized controlled trial. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2016 ; Vol. 104, No. 4. pp. 973-981.

Bibtex

@article{882a5ef49aa940e58bc4823abd8001f4,
title = "High intake of regular-fat cheese compared with reduced-fat cheese does not affect LDL cholesterol or risk markers of the metabolic syndrome: a randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Regular-fat cheese contains a high amount of saturated fat. Therefore, dietary guidelines in many countries recommend the consumption of reduced-fat cheese as opposed to regular-fat cheese. However, the negative effect of regular-fat cheese is still under debate.OBJECTIVES: The aim was to compare the effects of regular-fat cheese with an equal amount of reduced-fat cheese and an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate-rich foods on LDL cholesterol and risk factors for the metabolic syndrome (MetS).DESIGN: The study was a 12-wk randomized parallel intervention preceded by a 2-wk run-in period. A total of 164 subjects with ≥2 MetS risk factors were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 intervention groups: regular-fat cheese (REG), reduced-fat cheese (RED), or a no-cheese, carbohydrate control (CHO) group. Subjects in the REG and RED groups replaced part of their daily habitual diet with 80 g cheese/10 MJ, whereas subjects in the CHO group did the same with bread and jam corresponding to 90 g and 25 g/10 MJ, respectively.RESULTS: A total of 139 subjects completed the intervention. The primary outcome, LDL cholesterol, was not significantly different between the REG and RED diets or between the REG and CHO diets. There was no significant difference in HDL cholesterol between the REG and RED diets, but HDL cholesterol tended to be higher with the REG diet than with the CHO diet (0.06 ± 0.03 mmol/L; P = 0.07). Insulin, glucose, and triacylglycerol concentrations as well as blood pressure and waist circumference did not differ significantly between the 3 diets.CONCLUSION: A high daily intake of regular-fat cheese for 12 wk did not alter LDL cholesterol or MetS risk factors differently than an equal intake of reduced-fat cheese or an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate-rich foods. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02616471.",
keywords = "Faculty of Science, Saturated fat, Dairy, Triglycerides, Insulin, Glucose, Blood lipids",
author = "Farinaz Raziani and Tine Tholstrup and Kristensen, {Marlene Dahlwad} and Svanegaard, {Matilde L} and Christian Ritz and Arne Astrup and Anne Raben",
note = "CURIS 2016 NEXS 251",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.3945/ajcn.116.134932",
language = "English",
volume = "104",
pages = "973--981",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - High intake of regular-fat cheese compared with reduced-fat cheese does not affect LDL cholesterol or risk markers of the metabolic syndrome

T2 - a randomized controlled trial

AU - Raziani, Farinaz

AU - Tholstrup, Tine

AU - Kristensen, Marlene Dahlwad

AU - Svanegaard, Matilde L

AU - Ritz, Christian

AU - Astrup, Arne

AU - Raben, Anne

N1 - CURIS 2016 NEXS 251

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - BACKGROUND: Regular-fat cheese contains a high amount of saturated fat. Therefore, dietary guidelines in many countries recommend the consumption of reduced-fat cheese as opposed to regular-fat cheese. However, the negative effect of regular-fat cheese is still under debate.OBJECTIVES: The aim was to compare the effects of regular-fat cheese with an equal amount of reduced-fat cheese and an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate-rich foods on LDL cholesterol and risk factors for the metabolic syndrome (MetS).DESIGN: The study was a 12-wk randomized parallel intervention preceded by a 2-wk run-in period. A total of 164 subjects with ≥2 MetS risk factors were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 intervention groups: regular-fat cheese (REG), reduced-fat cheese (RED), or a no-cheese, carbohydrate control (CHO) group. Subjects in the REG and RED groups replaced part of their daily habitual diet with 80 g cheese/10 MJ, whereas subjects in the CHO group did the same with bread and jam corresponding to 90 g and 25 g/10 MJ, respectively.RESULTS: A total of 139 subjects completed the intervention. The primary outcome, LDL cholesterol, was not significantly different between the REG and RED diets or between the REG and CHO diets. There was no significant difference in HDL cholesterol between the REG and RED diets, but HDL cholesterol tended to be higher with the REG diet than with the CHO diet (0.06 ± 0.03 mmol/L; P = 0.07). Insulin, glucose, and triacylglycerol concentrations as well as blood pressure and waist circumference did not differ significantly between the 3 diets.CONCLUSION: A high daily intake of regular-fat cheese for 12 wk did not alter LDL cholesterol or MetS risk factors differently than an equal intake of reduced-fat cheese or an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate-rich foods. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02616471.

AB - BACKGROUND: Regular-fat cheese contains a high amount of saturated fat. Therefore, dietary guidelines in many countries recommend the consumption of reduced-fat cheese as opposed to regular-fat cheese. However, the negative effect of regular-fat cheese is still under debate.OBJECTIVES: The aim was to compare the effects of regular-fat cheese with an equal amount of reduced-fat cheese and an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate-rich foods on LDL cholesterol and risk factors for the metabolic syndrome (MetS).DESIGN: The study was a 12-wk randomized parallel intervention preceded by a 2-wk run-in period. A total of 164 subjects with ≥2 MetS risk factors were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 intervention groups: regular-fat cheese (REG), reduced-fat cheese (RED), or a no-cheese, carbohydrate control (CHO) group. Subjects in the REG and RED groups replaced part of their daily habitual diet with 80 g cheese/10 MJ, whereas subjects in the CHO group did the same with bread and jam corresponding to 90 g and 25 g/10 MJ, respectively.RESULTS: A total of 139 subjects completed the intervention. The primary outcome, LDL cholesterol, was not significantly different between the REG and RED diets or between the REG and CHO diets. There was no significant difference in HDL cholesterol between the REG and RED diets, but HDL cholesterol tended to be higher with the REG diet than with the CHO diet (0.06 ± 0.03 mmol/L; P = 0.07). Insulin, glucose, and triacylglycerol concentrations as well as blood pressure and waist circumference did not differ significantly between the 3 diets.CONCLUSION: A high daily intake of regular-fat cheese for 12 wk did not alter LDL cholesterol or MetS risk factors differently than an equal intake of reduced-fat cheese or an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate-rich foods. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02616471.

KW - Faculty of Science

KW - Saturated fat

KW - Dairy

KW - Triglycerides

KW - Insulin

KW - Glucose

KW - Blood lipids

U2 - 10.3945/ajcn.116.134932

DO - 10.3945/ajcn.116.134932

M3 - Journal article

VL - 104

SP - 973

EP - 981

JO - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 165660365