Genetically high plasma vitamin C and urate: a Mendelian randomization study in 106 147 individuals from the general population

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Camilla J Kobylecki, Shoaib Afzal, Børge G Nordestgaard

Objective: Gout is the most common form of inflammatory arthritis and is caused by hyperuricaemia. Some studies have found a reduction in plasma urate with vitamin C supplementation. We tested the hypothesis that high plasma vitamin C is causally associated with low plasma urate and low risk of hyperuricaemia, using a Mendelian randomization approach.

Methods: We measured plasma urate and genotyped for the SLC23A1 rs33972313 vitamin C variant in 106 147 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study, of which 24 099 had hyperuricaemia. We measured plasma vitamin C in 9234 individuals and genotyped for the SLC2A9 rs7442295 urate variant in 102 345 individuals.

Results: Each 10 µmol/l higher plasma vitamin C was associated with a -2.3(95%CI: -0.69 to -3.9) µmol/l lower plasma urate after multivariable adjustments. The SLC23A1 rs33972313 GG genotype was associated with a 9% (5.6%, 11.9%) higher plasma vitamin C compared with AA and AG combined but was not associated with plasma urate (P = 0.31). Likewise, for each 10 µmol/l higher plasma vitamin C the odds ratios for hyperuricaemia were 0.92 (0.86, 0.98) observationally after multivariable adjustments, but 1.01 (0.84, 1.23) genetically.

Conclusion: High plasma vitamin C was associated with low plasma urate and with low risk of hyperuricaemia. However, the SLC23A1 genetic variant causing lifelong high plasma vitamin C was not associated with plasma urate levels or with risk of hyperuricaemia. Thus, our data do not support a causal relationship between high plasma vitamin C and low plasma urate.

Original languageEnglish
JournalRheumatology
Volume57
Issue number10
Pages (from-to)1769-1776
ISSN1462-0324
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

    Research areas

  • Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Ascorbic Acid/blood, Female, Genetic Variation, Genotype, Humans, Hyperuricemia/blood, Male, Mendelian Randomization Analysis, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Overnutrition/blood, Risk Factors, Uric Acid/blood, Young Adult

ID: 217396677