Bone turnover, calcium homeostasis, and vitamin D status in Danish vegans

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Bone turnover, calcium homeostasis, and vitamin D status in Danish vegans. / Hansen, Tue Haldor; Madsen, Marie Terese Barlebo; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Cohen, Arieh S; Hansen, Torben; Vestergaard, Henrik; Pedersen, Oluf Borbye; Allin, Kristine Højgaard.

In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 72, No. 7, 23.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Hansen, TH, Madsen, MTB, Jørgensen, NR, Cohen, AS, Hansen, T, Vestergaard, H, Pedersen, OB & Allin, KH 2018, 'Bone turnover, calcium homeostasis, and vitamin D status in Danish vegans', European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 72, no. 7. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41430-017-0081-y

APA

Hansen, T. H., Madsen, M. T. B., Jørgensen, N. R., Cohen, A. S., Hansen, T., Vestergaard, H., ... Allin, K. H. (2018). Bone turnover, calcium homeostasis, and vitamin D status in Danish vegans. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 72(7). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41430-017-0081-y

Vancouver

Hansen TH, Madsen MTB, Jørgensen NR, Cohen AS, Hansen T, Vestergaard H et al. Bone turnover, calcium homeostasis, and vitamin D status in Danish vegans. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2018 Jan 23;72(7). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41430-017-0081-y

Author

Hansen, Tue Haldor ; Madsen, Marie Terese Barlebo ; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye ; Cohen, Arieh S ; Hansen, Torben ; Vestergaard, Henrik ; Pedersen, Oluf Borbye ; Allin, Kristine Højgaard. / Bone turnover, calcium homeostasis, and vitamin D status in Danish vegans. In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2018 ; Vol. 72, No. 7.

Bibtex

@article{259c7e30292048de8dfcc6caa002fbe5,
title = "Bone turnover, calcium homeostasis, and vitamin D status in Danish vegans",
abstract = "BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: A vegan diet has been associated with increased bone fracture risk, but the physiology linking nutritional exposure to bone metabolism has only been partially elucidated. This study investigated whether a vegan diet is associated with increased bone turnover and altered calcium homeostasis due to insufficient intake of calcium and vitamin D. SUBJECTS/METHODS: Fractionated and total 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)-D), parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium, and four bone turnover markers (osteocalcin, N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), and C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX)) were measured in serum from 78 vegans and 77 omnivores. RESULTS: When adjusting for seasonality and constitutional covariates (age, sex, and body fat percentage) vegans had higher concentrations of PINP (32 [95{\%} CI: 7, 64]{\%}, P = 0.01) and BAP (58 [95{\%} CI: 27, 97]{\%}, P < 0.001) compared to omnivores, whereas CTX (30 [95{\%} CI: -1, 72]{\%}, P = 0.06) and osteocalcin (21.8 [95{\%} CI: -9.3, 63.7]{\%}, P = 0.2) concentrations did not differ between the two groups. Vegans had higher serum PTH concentration (38 [95{\%} CI: 19, 60]{\%}; P < 0.001) and lower 25(OH)-D serum concentration (-33 [95{\%} CI: -45, -19]{\%}; P < 0.001), but similar serum calcium concentration (-1 [95{\%} CI: -3, 1]{\%}, P = 0.18 compared to omnivores. CONCLUSIONS: Vegans have higher levels of circulating bone turnover markers compared to omnivores, which may in the long-term lead to poorer bone health. Differences in dietary habits including intake of vitamin D and calcium may, at least partly, explain the observed differences.",
author = "Hansen, {Tue Haldor} and Madsen, {Marie Terese Barlebo} and J{\o}rgensen, {Niklas Rye} and Cohen, {Arieh S} and Torben Hansen and Henrik Vestergaard and Pedersen, {Oluf Borbye} and Allin, {Kristine H{\o}jgaard}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "23",
doi = "10.1038/s41430-017-0081-y",
language = "English",
volume = "72",
journal = "European Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0954-3007",
publisher = "nature publishing group",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bone turnover, calcium homeostasis, and vitamin D status in Danish vegans

AU - Hansen, Tue Haldor

AU - Madsen, Marie Terese Barlebo

AU - Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

AU - Cohen, Arieh S

AU - Hansen, Torben

AU - Vestergaard, Henrik

AU - Pedersen, Oluf Borbye

AU - Allin, Kristine Højgaard

PY - 2018/1/23

Y1 - 2018/1/23

N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: A vegan diet has been associated with increased bone fracture risk, but the physiology linking nutritional exposure to bone metabolism has only been partially elucidated. This study investigated whether a vegan diet is associated with increased bone turnover and altered calcium homeostasis due to insufficient intake of calcium and vitamin D. SUBJECTS/METHODS: Fractionated and total 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)-D), parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium, and four bone turnover markers (osteocalcin, N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), and C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX)) were measured in serum from 78 vegans and 77 omnivores. RESULTS: When adjusting for seasonality and constitutional covariates (age, sex, and body fat percentage) vegans had higher concentrations of PINP (32 [95% CI: 7, 64]%, P = 0.01) and BAP (58 [95% CI: 27, 97]%, P < 0.001) compared to omnivores, whereas CTX (30 [95% CI: -1, 72]%, P = 0.06) and osteocalcin (21.8 [95% CI: -9.3, 63.7]%, P = 0.2) concentrations did not differ between the two groups. Vegans had higher serum PTH concentration (38 [95% CI: 19, 60]%; P < 0.001) and lower 25(OH)-D serum concentration (-33 [95% CI: -45, -19]%; P < 0.001), but similar serum calcium concentration (-1 [95% CI: -3, 1]%, P = 0.18 compared to omnivores. CONCLUSIONS: Vegans have higher levels of circulating bone turnover markers compared to omnivores, which may in the long-term lead to poorer bone health. Differences in dietary habits including intake of vitamin D and calcium may, at least partly, explain the observed differences.

AB - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: A vegan diet has been associated with increased bone fracture risk, but the physiology linking nutritional exposure to bone metabolism has only been partially elucidated. This study investigated whether a vegan diet is associated with increased bone turnover and altered calcium homeostasis due to insufficient intake of calcium and vitamin D. SUBJECTS/METHODS: Fractionated and total 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)-D), parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium, and four bone turnover markers (osteocalcin, N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), and C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX)) were measured in serum from 78 vegans and 77 omnivores. RESULTS: When adjusting for seasonality and constitutional covariates (age, sex, and body fat percentage) vegans had higher concentrations of PINP (32 [95% CI: 7, 64]%, P = 0.01) and BAP (58 [95% CI: 27, 97]%, P < 0.001) compared to omnivores, whereas CTX (30 [95% CI: -1, 72]%, P = 0.06) and osteocalcin (21.8 [95% CI: -9.3, 63.7]%, P = 0.2) concentrations did not differ between the two groups. Vegans had higher serum PTH concentration (38 [95% CI: 19, 60]%; P < 0.001) and lower 25(OH)-D serum concentration (-33 [95% CI: -45, -19]%; P < 0.001), but similar serum calcium concentration (-1 [95% CI: -3, 1]%, P = 0.18 compared to omnivores. CONCLUSIONS: Vegans have higher levels of circulating bone turnover markers compared to omnivores, which may in the long-term lead to poorer bone health. Differences in dietary habits including intake of vitamin D and calcium may, at least partly, explain the observed differences.

U2 - 10.1038/s41430-017-0081-y

DO - 10.1038/s41430-017-0081-y

M3 - Journal article

VL - 72

JO - European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0954-3007

IS - 7

ER -

ID: 226870783