Anthropometric measurements can identify small for gestational age newborns: a cohort study in rural Tanzania

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Anthropometric measurements can identify small for gestational age newborns : a cohort study in rural Tanzania. / Paulsen, Cecilie Bøge; Nielsen, Birgitte Bruun; Msemo, Omari Abdul; Møller, Sofie Lykke; Ekmann, Josephine Roth; Theander, Thor Grundtvig; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Lusingu, John Peter Andrea; Minja, Daniel Thomas Remias; Schmiegelow, Christentze.

In: BMC Pediatrics, Vol. 19, No. 1, 120, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Paulsen, CB, Nielsen, BB, Msemo, OA, Møller, SL, Ekmann, JR, Theander, TG, Bygbjerg, IC, Lusingu, JPA, Minja, DTR & Schmiegelow, C 2019, 'Anthropometric measurements can identify small for gestational age newborns: a cohort study in rural Tanzania', BMC Pediatrics, vol. 19, no. 1, 120. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12887-019-1500-0

APA

Paulsen, C. B., Nielsen, B. B., Msemo, O. A., Møller, S. L., Ekmann, J. R., Theander, T. G., ... Schmiegelow, C. (2019). Anthropometric measurements can identify small for gestational age newborns: a cohort study in rural Tanzania. BMC Pediatrics, 19(1), [120]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12887-019-1500-0

Vancouver

Paulsen CB, Nielsen BB, Msemo OA, Møller SL, Ekmann JR, Theander TG et al. Anthropometric measurements can identify small for gestational age newborns: a cohort study in rural Tanzania. BMC Pediatrics. 2019;19(1). 120. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12887-019-1500-0

Author

Paulsen, Cecilie Bøge ; Nielsen, Birgitte Bruun ; Msemo, Omari Abdul ; Møller, Sofie Lykke ; Ekmann, Josephine Roth ; Theander, Thor Grundtvig ; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian ; Lusingu, John Peter Andrea ; Minja, Daniel Thomas Remias ; Schmiegelow, Christentze. / Anthropometric measurements can identify small for gestational age newborns : a cohort study in rural Tanzania. In: BMC Pediatrics. 2019 ; Vol. 19, No. 1.

Bibtex

@article{6e8656c19cfa4a9aa5229ce5dd604b4e,
title = "Anthropometric measurements can identify small for gestational age newborns: a cohort study in rural Tanzania",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Small-for-gestational-age (SGA) is associated with increased neonatal mortality and morbidity. In low and middle income countries an accurate gestational age is often not known, making the identification of SGA newborns difficult. Measuring foot length, chest circumference and mid upper arm circumference (MUAC) of the newborn have previously been shown to be reasonable methods for detecting low birth weight (< 2500 g) and prematurity (gestational age <  37 weeks). The aim of this study was to investigate if the three anthropometric measurements could also correctly identify SGA newborns.METHODS: In the current study from a rural area of northeastern Tanzania, 376 live newborns had foot length, chest circumference, and MUAC measured within 24 h of birth. Gestational age was estimated by transabdominal ultrasound in early pregnancy and SGA was diagnosed using a sex-specific weight reference chart previously developed in the study area. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated for each of the anthropometric measurements and the area under the curve (AUC) compared. Operational cutoffs for foot length, chest circumference, and MUAC were defined while balancing as high as possible sensitivity and specificity for identifying SGA. Positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were then calculated.RESULTS: Of the 376 newborns, 68 (18.4{\%}) were SGA. The AUC for detecting SGA was 0.78 for foot length, 0.88 for chest circumference, and 0.85 for MUAC. Operational cut-offs to detect SGA newborns were defined as ≤7.7 cm for foot length, ≤31.6 cm for chest circumference and ≤ 10.1 cm for MUAC. Foot length had 74{\%} sensitivity, 69{\%} specificity, PPV of 0.35 and NPV of 0.92 for identifying SGA. Chest circumference had 79{\%} sensitivity, 81{\%} specificity, PPV of 0.49 and NPV of 0.95 for identifying SGA. Finally, MUAC had 76{\%} sensitivity, 77{\%} specificity, PPV of 0.43 and NPV of 0.94 for identifying SGA.CONCLUSION: In a setting with limited availability of an accurate gestational age, all three methods had a high NPV and could be used to rule out the newborn as being SGA. Overall, chest circumference was the best method to identify SGA newborns, whereas foot length and MUAC had lower detection ability.TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov ( NCT02191683 ). Registered 2 July 2014.",
author = "Paulsen, {Cecilie B{\o}ge} and Nielsen, {Birgitte Bruun} and Msemo, {Omari Abdul} and M{\o}ller, {Sofie Lykke} and Ekmann, {Josephine Roth} and Theander, {Thor Grundtvig} and Bygbjerg, {Ib Christian} and Lusingu, {John Peter Andrea} and Minja, {Daniel Thomas Remias} and Christentze Schmiegelow",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1186/s12887-019-1500-0",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
journal = "B M C Pediatrics",
issn = "1471-2431",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Anthropometric measurements can identify small for gestational age newborns

T2 - a cohort study in rural Tanzania

AU - Paulsen, Cecilie Bøge

AU - Nielsen, Birgitte Bruun

AU - Msemo, Omari Abdul

AU - Møller, Sofie Lykke

AU - Ekmann, Josephine Roth

AU - Theander, Thor Grundtvig

AU - Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

AU - Lusingu, John Peter Andrea

AU - Minja, Daniel Thomas Remias

AU - Schmiegelow, Christentze

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - BACKGROUND: Small-for-gestational-age (SGA) is associated with increased neonatal mortality and morbidity. In low and middle income countries an accurate gestational age is often not known, making the identification of SGA newborns difficult. Measuring foot length, chest circumference and mid upper arm circumference (MUAC) of the newborn have previously been shown to be reasonable methods for detecting low birth weight (< 2500 g) and prematurity (gestational age <  37 weeks). The aim of this study was to investigate if the three anthropometric measurements could also correctly identify SGA newborns.METHODS: In the current study from a rural area of northeastern Tanzania, 376 live newborns had foot length, chest circumference, and MUAC measured within 24 h of birth. Gestational age was estimated by transabdominal ultrasound in early pregnancy and SGA was diagnosed using a sex-specific weight reference chart previously developed in the study area. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated for each of the anthropometric measurements and the area under the curve (AUC) compared. Operational cutoffs for foot length, chest circumference, and MUAC were defined while balancing as high as possible sensitivity and specificity for identifying SGA. Positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were then calculated.RESULTS: Of the 376 newborns, 68 (18.4%) were SGA. The AUC for detecting SGA was 0.78 for foot length, 0.88 for chest circumference, and 0.85 for MUAC. Operational cut-offs to detect SGA newborns were defined as ≤7.7 cm for foot length, ≤31.6 cm for chest circumference and ≤ 10.1 cm for MUAC. Foot length had 74% sensitivity, 69% specificity, PPV of 0.35 and NPV of 0.92 for identifying SGA. Chest circumference had 79% sensitivity, 81% specificity, PPV of 0.49 and NPV of 0.95 for identifying SGA. Finally, MUAC had 76% sensitivity, 77% specificity, PPV of 0.43 and NPV of 0.94 for identifying SGA.CONCLUSION: In a setting with limited availability of an accurate gestational age, all three methods had a high NPV and could be used to rule out the newborn as being SGA. Overall, chest circumference was the best method to identify SGA newborns, whereas foot length and MUAC had lower detection ability.TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov ( NCT02191683 ). Registered 2 July 2014.

AB - BACKGROUND: Small-for-gestational-age (SGA) is associated with increased neonatal mortality and morbidity. In low and middle income countries an accurate gestational age is often not known, making the identification of SGA newborns difficult. Measuring foot length, chest circumference and mid upper arm circumference (MUAC) of the newborn have previously been shown to be reasonable methods for detecting low birth weight (< 2500 g) and prematurity (gestational age <  37 weeks). The aim of this study was to investigate if the three anthropometric measurements could also correctly identify SGA newborns.METHODS: In the current study from a rural area of northeastern Tanzania, 376 live newborns had foot length, chest circumference, and MUAC measured within 24 h of birth. Gestational age was estimated by transabdominal ultrasound in early pregnancy and SGA was diagnosed using a sex-specific weight reference chart previously developed in the study area. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated for each of the anthropometric measurements and the area under the curve (AUC) compared. Operational cutoffs for foot length, chest circumference, and MUAC were defined while balancing as high as possible sensitivity and specificity for identifying SGA. Positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were then calculated.RESULTS: Of the 376 newborns, 68 (18.4%) were SGA. The AUC for detecting SGA was 0.78 for foot length, 0.88 for chest circumference, and 0.85 for MUAC. Operational cut-offs to detect SGA newborns were defined as ≤7.7 cm for foot length, ≤31.6 cm for chest circumference and ≤ 10.1 cm for MUAC. Foot length had 74% sensitivity, 69% specificity, PPV of 0.35 and NPV of 0.92 for identifying SGA. Chest circumference had 79% sensitivity, 81% specificity, PPV of 0.49 and NPV of 0.95 for identifying SGA. Finally, MUAC had 76% sensitivity, 77% specificity, PPV of 0.43 and NPV of 0.94 for identifying SGA.CONCLUSION: In a setting with limited availability of an accurate gestational age, all three methods had a high NPV and could be used to rule out the newborn as being SGA. Overall, chest circumference was the best method to identify SGA newborns, whereas foot length and MUAC had lower detection ability.TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov ( NCT02191683 ). Registered 2 July 2014.

U2 - 10.1186/s12887-019-1500-0

DO - 10.1186/s12887-019-1500-0

M3 - Journal article

VL - 19

JO - B M C Pediatrics

JF - B M C Pediatrics

SN - 1471-2431

IS - 1

M1 - 120

ER -

ID: 217569244