A possible link between food and mood: dietary impact on gut microbiota and behavior in BALB/c mice

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A possible link between food and mood : dietary impact on gut microbiota and behavior in BALB/c mice. / Jørgensen, Bettina Merete Pyndt; Hansen, Julie Torpe; Krych, Lukasz; Larsen, Christian Schiøth; Klein, Anders Bue; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Josefsen, Knud; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Sørensen, Dorte Bratbo.

In: PLOS ONE, Vol. 9, No. 8, 2014, p. e103398.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Jørgensen, BMP, Hansen, JT, Krych, L, Larsen, CS, Klein, AB, Nielsen, DS, Josefsen, K, Hansen, AK & Sørensen, DB 2014, 'A possible link between food and mood: dietary impact on gut microbiota and behavior in BALB/c mice', PLOS ONE, vol. 9, no. 8, pp. e103398. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0103398

APA

Jørgensen, B. M. P., Hansen, J. T., Krych, L., Larsen, C. S., Klein, A. B., Nielsen, D. S., ... Sørensen, D. B. (2014). A possible link between food and mood: dietary impact on gut microbiota and behavior in BALB/c mice. PLOS ONE, 9(8), e103398. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0103398

Vancouver

Jørgensen BMP, Hansen JT, Krych L, Larsen CS, Klein AB, Nielsen DS et al. A possible link between food and mood: dietary impact on gut microbiota and behavior in BALB/c mice. PLOS ONE. 2014;9(8):e103398. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0103398

Author

Jørgensen, Bettina Merete Pyndt ; Hansen, Julie Torpe ; Krych, Lukasz ; Larsen, Christian Schiøth ; Klein, Anders Bue ; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris ; Josefsen, Knud ; Hansen, Axel Kornerup ; Sørensen, Dorte Bratbo. / A possible link between food and mood : dietary impact on gut microbiota and behavior in BALB/c mice. In: PLOS ONE. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 8. pp. e103398.

Bibtex

@article{70ba839b1d6944c4b2db5cb17574d0b3,
title = "A possible link between food and mood: dietary impact on gut microbiota and behavior in BALB/c mice",
abstract = "Major depressive disorder is a debilitating disease in the Western World. A western diet high in saturated fat and refined sugar seems to play an important part in disease development. Therefore, this study is aimed at investigating whether saturated fat or sucrose predisposes mice to develop behavioral symptoms which can be interpreted as depression-like, and the possible influence of the gut microbiota (GM) in this. Fourty-two mice were randomly assigned to one of three experimental diets, a high-fat, a high-sucrose or a control diet for thirteen weeks. Mice on high-fat diet gained more weight (p = 0.00009), displayed significantly less burrowing behavior than the control mice (p = 0.034), and showed decreased memory in the Morris water maze test compared to mice on high-sucrose diet (p = 0.031). Mice on high-sucrose diet burrowed less goal-oriented, showed greater latency to first bout of immobility in the forced swim test when compared to control mice (p = 0.039) and high-fat fed mice (p = 0.013), and displayed less anxiety than mice on high-fat diet in the triple test (p = 0.009). Behavioral changes were accompanied by a significant change in GM composition of mice fed a high-fat diet, while no difference between diet groups was observed for sucrose preferences, LPS, cholesterol, HbA1c, BDNF and the cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12(p70), IL-17 and TNF-α. A series of correlations was found between GM, behavior, BDNF and inflammatory mediators. In conclusion, the study shows that dietary fat and sucrose affect behavior, sometimes in opposite directions, and suggests a possible association between GM and behavior.",
keywords = "The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Diet, Behavior, Gut microbiota",
author = "J{\o}rgensen, {Bettina Merete Pyndt} and Hansen, {Julie Torpe} and Lukasz Krych and Larsen, {Christian Schi{\o}th} and Klein, {Anders Bue} and Nielsen, {Dennis Sandris} and Knud Josefsen and Hansen, {Axel Kornerup} and S{\o}rensen, {Dorte Bratbo}",
note = "OA",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0103398",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "e103398",
journal = "P L o S One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A possible link between food and mood

T2 - dietary impact on gut microbiota and behavior in BALB/c mice

AU - Jørgensen, Bettina Merete Pyndt

AU - Hansen, Julie Torpe

AU - Krych, Lukasz

AU - Larsen, Christian Schiøth

AU - Klein, Anders Bue

AU - Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

AU - Josefsen, Knud

AU - Hansen, Axel Kornerup

AU - Sørensen, Dorte Bratbo

N1 - OA

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Major depressive disorder is a debilitating disease in the Western World. A western diet high in saturated fat and refined sugar seems to play an important part in disease development. Therefore, this study is aimed at investigating whether saturated fat or sucrose predisposes mice to develop behavioral symptoms which can be interpreted as depression-like, and the possible influence of the gut microbiota (GM) in this. Fourty-two mice were randomly assigned to one of three experimental diets, a high-fat, a high-sucrose or a control diet for thirteen weeks. Mice on high-fat diet gained more weight (p = 0.00009), displayed significantly less burrowing behavior than the control mice (p = 0.034), and showed decreased memory in the Morris water maze test compared to mice on high-sucrose diet (p = 0.031). Mice on high-sucrose diet burrowed less goal-oriented, showed greater latency to first bout of immobility in the forced swim test when compared to control mice (p = 0.039) and high-fat fed mice (p = 0.013), and displayed less anxiety than mice on high-fat diet in the triple test (p = 0.009). Behavioral changes were accompanied by a significant change in GM composition of mice fed a high-fat diet, while no difference between diet groups was observed for sucrose preferences, LPS, cholesterol, HbA1c, BDNF and the cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12(p70), IL-17 and TNF-α. A series of correlations was found between GM, behavior, BDNF and inflammatory mediators. In conclusion, the study shows that dietary fat and sucrose affect behavior, sometimes in opposite directions, and suggests a possible association between GM and behavior.

AB - Major depressive disorder is a debilitating disease in the Western World. A western diet high in saturated fat and refined sugar seems to play an important part in disease development. Therefore, this study is aimed at investigating whether saturated fat or sucrose predisposes mice to develop behavioral symptoms which can be interpreted as depression-like, and the possible influence of the gut microbiota (GM) in this. Fourty-two mice were randomly assigned to one of three experimental diets, a high-fat, a high-sucrose or a control diet for thirteen weeks. Mice on high-fat diet gained more weight (p = 0.00009), displayed significantly less burrowing behavior than the control mice (p = 0.034), and showed decreased memory in the Morris water maze test compared to mice on high-sucrose diet (p = 0.031). Mice on high-sucrose diet burrowed less goal-oriented, showed greater latency to first bout of immobility in the forced swim test when compared to control mice (p = 0.039) and high-fat fed mice (p = 0.013), and displayed less anxiety than mice on high-fat diet in the triple test (p = 0.009). Behavioral changes were accompanied by a significant change in GM composition of mice fed a high-fat diet, while no difference between diet groups was observed for sucrose preferences, LPS, cholesterol, HbA1c, BDNF and the cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12(p70), IL-17 and TNF-α. A series of correlations was found between GM, behavior, BDNF and inflammatory mediators. In conclusion, the study shows that dietary fat and sucrose affect behavior, sometimes in opposite directions, and suggests a possible association between GM and behavior.

KW - The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

KW - Diet

KW - Behavior

KW - Gut microbiota

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0103398

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0103398

M3 - Journal article

VL - 9

SP - e103398

JO - P L o S One

JF - P L o S One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 8

ER -

ID: 122547056