A Legal Institutional Perspective on the European External Action Service

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

A Legal Institutional Perspective on the European External Action Service. / Van Vooren, Bart.

In: Common Market Law Review, Vol. 48, No. 2, 2011, p. 475-502.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Van Vooren, B 2011, 'A Legal Institutional Perspective on the European External Action Service', Common Market Law Review, vol. 48, no. 2, pp. 475-502.

APA

Van Vooren, B. (2011). A Legal Institutional Perspective on the European External Action Service. Common Market Law Review, 48(2), 475-502.

Vancouver

Van Vooren B. A Legal Institutional Perspective on the European External Action Service. Common Market Law Review. 2011;48(2):475-502.

Author

Van Vooren, Bart. / A Legal Institutional Perspective on the European External Action Service. In: Common Market Law Review. 2011 ; Vol. 48, No. 2. pp. 475-502.

Bibtex

@article{67cf993ac426486e98855ca2d739f2d4,
title = "A Legal Institutional Perspective on the European External Action Service",
abstract = "This article provides a legal perspective on the new European External Action Service (EEAS), and positions this new body in the reshuffled institutional balance of EU external relations. Towards that end, the paper examines the EEAS’ legal nature as compared to that of Council, Commission, their support services and EU agencies, and seeks to define the EEAS’ sui generis status in the EU institutional set-up: What are the implications of its absence of legal personality, what does its ‘functional autonomy’ from the Council and Commission imply, what are its formal powers – if any, and could the EEAS be drawn into proceedings before the Court of Justice? In answering those questions, this article then examines to which extent the legal-institutional choices on the structure of the EU External Action Service reflects the age-old tension entrenched in EU external relations law: the EU’s nature as an internally diverse entity, which seeks to present a coherent Union voice to the world.",
keywords = "The Faculty of Law",
author = "{Van Vooren}, Bart",
year = "2011",
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "475--502",
journal = "Common Market Law Review",
issn = "0165-0750",
publisher = "Kluwer Law International",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Legal Institutional Perspective on the European External Action Service

AU - Van Vooren, Bart

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - This article provides a legal perspective on the new European External Action Service (EEAS), and positions this new body in the reshuffled institutional balance of EU external relations. Towards that end, the paper examines the EEAS’ legal nature as compared to that of Council, Commission, their support services and EU agencies, and seeks to define the EEAS’ sui generis status in the EU institutional set-up: What are the implications of its absence of legal personality, what does its ‘functional autonomy’ from the Council and Commission imply, what are its formal powers – if any, and could the EEAS be drawn into proceedings before the Court of Justice? In answering those questions, this article then examines to which extent the legal-institutional choices on the structure of the EU External Action Service reflects the age-old tension entrenched in EU external relations law: the EU’s nature as an internally diverse entity, which seeks to present a coherent Union voice to the world.

AB - This article provides a legal perspective on the new European External Action Service (EEAS), and positions this new body in the reshuffled institutional balance of EU external relations. Towards that end, the paper examines the EEAS’ legal nature as compared to that of Council, Commission, their support services and EU agencies, and seeks to define the EEAS’ sui generis status in the EU institutional set-up: What are the implications of its absence of legal personality, what does its ‘functional autonomy’ from the Council and Commission imply, what are its formal powers – if any, and could the EEAS be drawn into proceedings before the Court of Justice? In answering those questions, this article then examines to which extent the legal-institutional choices on the structure of the EU External Action Service reflects the age-old tension entrenched in EU external relations law: the EU’s nature as an internally diverse entity, which seeks to present a coherent Union voice to the world.

KW - The Faculty of Law

M3 - Journal article

VL - 48

SP - 475

EP - 502

JO - Common Market Law Review

JF - Common Market Law Review

SN - 0165-0750

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 33221348