Ole Dreier

Ole Dreier

!!Emeritus

Primary fields of research

Personality theory

Personal change, learning, and development

Personal conduct of everyday life

Practice research of persons changing, learning, and developing in an interplay between institutional interventions (counseling, psychoptherapy, education, health care, rehabilitation) and their everyday lives

Current research

I combine basic research in personality psychology with applied practice research in fields associated with psychology such as psychotherapy and counseling, health care, education, and professional work practices. My current research focuses on the significance of the personal conduct of everyday life for personality and for the mode of working of professional interventions. This includes studies of the ways in which persons change and learn in their everyday lives and, in doing so, draw on professional expertise and interventions

My current research activities therefore consist in:  

heading a research group on "Personal Conduct of Life and Intervention" at my department

finishing a book chapter on 'Intervention, evidence-based research, and everyday life' on the background of a paper presented at the congress of International Society for Theoretical Psychology in Nanjing, China, May 2009.

finishing a journal article on 'Personality and conduct of everyday life the background of my key note address in personality psychology at the European Congress of Psychology, July 2009

preparing a key note for a conference on 'Subjectivity and learning in everyday life', may 2010

working out a paper on "Psychological Intervention and Personal Conduct of Life" for the journal Theory & Psychology

working out  a paper for a journal on "The Client's Voice in Case Studies of Counselling and Psychotherapy" as a member of an English-American research network on "systematic single case research methodology"

assist in the publication of a Chinese edition of my book "Psychotherapy in Everyday Life"

Teaching

Personality psychology, community psychology.

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