Programming of glucose-insulin homoeostasis: long-term consequences of pre-natal versus early post-natal nutrition insults. Evidence from a sheep model

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Programming of glucose-insulin homoeostasis : long-term consequences of pre-natal versus early post-natal nutrition insults. Evidence from a sheep model. / Kongsted, Anna Hauntoft; Tygesen, M. P.; Husted, Sanne Vinter; Oliver, M. H.; Tolver, Anders; Christensen, Vibeke Grøsfjeld; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis; Nielsen, Mette Olaf.

I: Acta Physiologica (Print), Bind 210, Nr. 1, 2014, s. 84-98.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Kongsted, AH, Tygesen, MP, Husted, SV, Oliver, MH, Tolver, A, Christensen, VG, Nielsen, JH & Nielsen, MO 2014, 'Programming of glucose-insulin homoeostasis: long-term consequences of pre-natal versus early post-natal nutrition insults. Evidence from a sheep model', Acta Physiologica (Print), bind 210, nr. 1, s. 84-98. https://doi.org/10.1111/apha.12080

APA

Kongsted, A. H., Tygesen, M. P., Husted, S. V., Oliver, M. H., Tolver, A., Christensen, V. G., ... Nielsen, M. O. (2014). Programming of glucose-insulin homoeostasis: long-term consequences of pre-natal versus early post-natal nutrition insults. Evidence from a sheep model. Acta Physiologica (Print), 210(1), 84-98. https://doi.org/10.1111/apha.12080

Vancouver

Kongsted AH, Tygesen MP, Husted SV, Oliver MH, Tolver A, Christensen VG o.a. Programming of glucose-insulin homoeostasis: long-term consequences of pre-natal versus early post-natal nutrition insults. Evidence from a sheep model. Acta Physiologica (Print). 2014;210(1):84-98. https://doi.org/10.1111/apha.12080

Author

Kongsted, Anna Hauntoft ; Tygesen, M. P. ; Husted, Sanne Vinter ; Oliver, M. H. ; Tolver, Anders ; Christensen, Vibeke Grøsfjeld ; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis ; Nielsen, Mette Olaf. / Programming of glucose-insulin homoeostasis : long-term consequences of pre-natal versus early post-natal nutrition insults. Evidence from a sheep model. I: Acta Physiologica (Print). 2014 ; Bind 210, Nr. 1. s. 84-98.

Bibtex

@article{d640981f8bab4c0f94ca03de81508e84,
title = "Programming of glucose-insulin homoeostasis: long-term consequences of pre-natal versus early post-natal nutrition insults. Evidence from a sheep model",
abstract = "AIM: Exposure to adverse intra-uterine conditions can predispose for metabolic disorders later in life. By using a sheep model, we studied (i) how programming of glucose-insulin homoeostasis during late gestation is manifested later in life depending on the early post-natal dietary exposure and (ii) whether dietary alteration in obese individuals can prevent adverse outcomes of early life programming. METHODS: During late gestation, twin-pregnant sheep were fed 100{\%} (NORM) or 50{\%} (LOW) of energy and protein requirements. After birth, offspring were exposed to a moderate (CONV) or high-carbohydrate-high-fat (HCHF) diet until around puberty. Offspring remaining thereafter (exclusively females) were fed a moderate diet until young adulthood. RESULTS: LOW lambs had increased insulin secretory responses during intravenous glucose tolerance tests indicative of reduced insulin sensitivity. HCHF lambs were hypertriglyceridaemic, 75{\%} had mild pancreatic collagen infiltration, and their acute insulin secretory response and insulin clearance during intravenous glucose and insulin tolerance tests, respectively, were reduced. However, NORM-HCHF in contrast to LOW-HCHF lambs had normal glucose tolerance, indicating that later health outcomes are highly influenced by pre-natal nutrition. Dietary alteration normalized glucose-insulin homoeostasis in adult HCHF females, whereas late-gestation undernutrition (LOW) permanently depressed insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSION: Maintenance of glucose tolerance in sheep exposed to pre-natal undernutrition relied on pancreatic hypersecretion of insulin to compensate for reduced insulin sensitivity. A mismatching high-fat diet in early post-natal life interfered with this pancreatic hypersecretion resulting in reduced glucose tolerance. Early post-natal, but not late pre-natal, impacts on glucose-insulin homoeostasis could be reversed by dietary correction later in life.",
author = "Kongsted, {Anna Hauntoft} and Tygesen, {M. P.} and Husted, {Sanne Vinter} and Oliver, {M. H.} and Anders Tolver and Christensen, {Vibeke Gr{\o}sfjeld} and Nielsen, {Jens H{\o}iriis} and Nielsen, {Mette Olaf}",
note = "Acta Physiologica {\circledC} 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society.",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1111/apha.12080",
language = "English",
volume = "210",
pages = "84--98",
journal = "Acta Physiologica (Print)",
issn = "1748-1708",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Programming of glucose-insulin homoeostasis

T2 - long-term consequences of pre-natal versus early post-natal nutrition insults. Evidence from a sheep model

AU - Kongsted, Anna Hauntoft

AU - Tygesen, M. P.

AU - Husted, Sanne Vinter

AU - Oliver, M. H.

AU - Tolver, Anders

AU - Christensen, Vibeke Grøsfjeld

AU - Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

AU - Nielsen, Mette Olaf

N1 - Acta Physiologica © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - AIM: Exposure to adverse intra-uterine conditions can predispose for metabolic disorders later in life. By using a sheep model, we studied (i) how programming of glucose-insulin homoeostasis during late gestation is manifested later in life depending on the early post-natal dietary exposure and (ii) whether dietary alteration in obese individuals can prevent adverse outcomes of early life programming. METHODS: During late gestation, twin-pregnant sheep were fed 100% (NORM) or 50% (LOW) of energy and protein requirements. After birth, offspring were exposed to a moderate (CONV) or high-carbohydrate-high-fat (HCHF) diet until around puberty. Offspring remaining thereafter (exclusively females) were fed a moderate diet until young adulthood. RESULTS: LOW lambs had increased insulin secretory responses during intravenous glucose tolerance tests indicative of reduced insulin sensitivity. HCHF lambs were hypertriglyceridaemic, 75% had mild pancreatic collagen infiltration, and their acute insulin secretory response and insulin clearance during intravenous glucose and insulin tolerance tests, respectively, were reduced. However, NORM-HCHF in contrast to LOW-HCHF lambs had normal glucose tolerance, indicating that later health outcomes are highly influenced by pre-natal nutrition. Dietary alteration normalized glucose-insulin homoeostasis in adult HCHF females, whereas late-gestation undernutrition (LOW) permanently depressed insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSION: Maintenance of glucose tolerance in sheep exposed to pre-natal undernutrition relied on pancreatic hypersecretion of insulin to compensate for reduced insulin sensitivity. A mismatching high-fat diet in early post-natal life interfered with this pancreatic hypersecretion resulting in reduced glucose tolerance. Early post-natal, but not late pre-natal, impacts on glucose-insulin homoeostasis could be reversed by dietary correction later in life.

AB - AIM: Exposure to adverse intra-uterine conditions can predispose for metabolic disorders later in life. By using a sheep model, we studied (i) how programming of glucose-insulin homoeostasis during late gestation is manifested later in life depending on the early post-natal dietary exposure and (ii) whether dietary alteration in obese individuals can prevent adverse outcomes of early life programming. METHODS: During late gestation, twin-pregnant sheep were fed 100% (NORM) or 50% (LOW) of energy and protein requirements. After birth, offspring were exposed to a moderate (CONV) or high-carbohydrate-high-fat (HCHF) diet until around puberty. Offspring remaining thereafter (exclusively females) were fed a moderate diet until young adulthood. RESULTS: LOW lambs had increased insulin secretory responses during intravenous glucose tolerance tests indicative of reduced insulin sensitivity. HCHF lambs were hypertriglyceridaemic, 75% had mild pancreatic collagen infiltration, and their acute insulin secretory response and insulin clearance during intravenous glucose and insulin tolerance tests, respectively, were reduced. However, NORM-HCHF in contrast to LOW-HCHF lambs had normal glucose tolerance, indicating that later health outcomes are highly influenced by pre-natal nutrition. Dietary alteration normalized glucose-insulin homoeostasis in adult HCHF females, whereas late-gestation undernutrition (LOW) permanently depressed insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSION: Maintenance of glucose tolerance in sheep exposed to pre-natal undernutrition relied on pancreatic hypersecretion of insulin to compensate for reduced insulin sensitivity. A mismatching high-fat diet in early post-natal life interfered with this pancreatic hypersecretion resulting in reduced glucose tolerance. Early post-natal, but not late pre-natal, impacts on glucose-insulin homoeostasis could be reversed by dietary correction later in life.

U2 - 10.1111/apha.12080

DO - 10.1111/apha.12080

M3 - Journal article

VL - 210

SP - 84

EP - 98

JO - Acta Physiologica (Print)

JF - Acta Physiologica (Print)

SN - 1748-1708

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 47971972