Oxidation of heparan sulphate by hypochlorite: role of N-chloro derivatives and dichloramine-dependent fragmentation

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Oxidation of heparan sulphate by hypochlorite : role of N-chloro derivatives and dichloramine-dependent fragmentation. / Rees, Martin D; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael Jonathan.

In: Biochemical Journal, Vol. 391, No. Pt 1, 01.10.2005, p. 125-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Rees, MD, Pattison, DI & Davies, MJ 2005, 'Oxidation of heparan sulphate by hypochlorite: role of N-chloro derivatives and dichloramine-dependent fragmentation', Biochemical Journal, vol. 391, no. Pt 1, pp. 125-34. https://doi.org/10.1042/BJ20050630

APA

Rees, M. D., Pattison, D. I., & Davies, M. J. (2005). Oxidation of heparan sulphate by hypochlorite: role of N-chloro derivatives and dichloramine-dependent fragmentation. Biochemical Journal, 391(Pt 1), 125-34. https://doi.org/10.1042/BJ20050630

Vancouver

Rees MD, Pattison DI, Davies MJ. Oxidation of heparan sulphate by hypochlorite: role of N-chloro derivatives and dichloramine-dependent fragmentation. Biochemical Journal. 2005 Oct 1;391(Pt 1):125-34. https://doi.org/10.1042/BJ20050630

Author

Rees, Martin D ; Pattison, David I ; Davies, Michael Jonathan. / Oxidation of heparan sulphate by hypochlorite : role of N-chloro derivatives and dichloramine-dependent fragmentation. In: Biochemical Journal. 2005 ; Vol. 391, No. Pt 1. pp. 125-34.

Bibtex

@article{82760ec74a4d4c6ab1b3b1d5ba11e789,
title = "Oxidation of heparan sulphate by hypochlorite: role of N-chloro derivatives and dichloramine-dependent fragmentation",
abstract = "Activated phagocytes release the haem enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase) and produce superoxide radicals and H2O2 via an oxidative burst. MPO uses H2O2 and Cl- to form HOCl, the physiological mixture of hypochlorous acid and its anion present at pH 7.4. As MPO binds to glycosaminoglycans, oxidation of extracellular matrix and cell surfaces by HOCl may be localized to these materials. However, the reactions of HOCl with glycosaminoglycans are poorly characterized. The GlcNAc (N-acetylglucosamine), GlcNSO3 (glucosamine-N-sulphate) and GlcNH2 [(N-unsubstituted) glucosamine] residues of heparan sulphate are potential targets for HOCl. It is shown here that HOCl reacts with each of these residues to generate N-chloro derivatives, and the absolute rate constants for these reactions have been determined. Reaction at GlcNH2 residues yields chloramines and, subsequently, dichloramines with markedly slower rates, k2 approximately 3.1x10(5) and 9 M(-1) x s(-1) (at 37 degrees C) respectively. Reaction at GlcNSO3 and GlcNAc residues yields N-chlorosulphonamides and chloramides with k2 approximately 0.05 and 0.01 M(-1) x s(-1) (at 37 degrees C) respectively. The corresponding monosaccharides display a similar pattern of reactivity. Decay of the polymer-derived chloramines, N-chlorosulphonamides and chloramides is slow at 37 degrees C and does not result in major structural changes. In contrast, dichloramine decay is rapid at 37 degrees C and results in fragmentation of the polymer backbone. Computational modelling of the reaction of HOCl with heparan sulphate proteoglycans (glypican-1 and perlecan) predicts that the GlcNH2 residues of heparan sulphate are major sites of attack. These results suggest that HOCl may be an important mediator of damage to glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans at inflammatory foci.",
keywords = "Animals, Carbohydrate Conformation, Chloramines, Chlorides, Computer Simulation, Glycosaminoglycans, Heparin, Heparitin Sulfate, Hypochlorous Acid, Kinetics, Oxidation-Reduction, Proteoglycans, Swine",
author = "Rees, {Martin D} and Pattison, {David I} and Davies, {Michael Jonathan}",
year = "2005",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1042/BJ20050630",
language = "English",
volume = "391",
pages = "125--34",
journal = "Biochemical Journal",
issn = "0264-6021",
publisher = "Portland Press Ltd.",
number = "Pt 1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oxidation of heparan sulphate by hypochlorite

T2 - role of N-chloro derivatives and dichloramine-dependent fragmentation

AU - Rees, Martin D

AU - Pattison, David I

AU - Davies, Michael Jonathan

PY - 2005/10/1

Y1 - 2005/10/1

N2 - Activated phagocytes release the haem enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase) and produce superoxide radicals and H2O2 via an oxidative burst. MPO uses H2O2 and Cl- to form HOCl, the physiological mixture of hypochlorous acid and its anion present at pH 7.4. As MPO binds to glycosaminoglycans, oxidation of extracellular matrix and cell surfaces by HOCl may be localized to these materials. However, the reactions of HOCl with glycosaminoglycans are poorly characterized. The GlcNAc (N-acetylglucosamine), GlcNSO3 (glucosamine-N-sulphate) and GlcNH2 [(N-unsubstituted) glucosamine] residues of heparan sulphate are potential targets for HOCl. It is shown here that HOCl reacts with each of these residues to generate N-chloro derivatives, and the absolute rate constants for these reactions have been determined. Reaction at GlcNH2 residues yields chloramines and, subsequently, dichloramines with markedly slower rates, k2 approximately 3.1x10(5) and 9 M(-1) x s(-1) (at 37 degrees C) respectively. Reaction at GlcNSO3 and GlcNAc residues yields N-chlorosulphonamides and chloramides with k2 approximately 0.05 and 0.01 M(-1) x s(-1) (at 37 degrees C) respectively. The corresponding monosaccharides display a similar pattern of reactivity. Decay of the polymer-derived chloramines, N-chlorosulphonamides and chloramides is slow at 37 degrees C and does not result in major structural changes. In contrast, dichloramine decay is rapid at 37 degrees C and results in fragmentation of the polymer backbone. Computational modelling of the reaction of HOCl with heparan sulphate proteoglycans (glypican-1 and perlecan) predicts that the GlcNH2 residues of heparan sulphate are major sites of attack. These results suggest that HOCl may be an important mediator of damage to glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans at inflammatory foci.

AB - Activated phagocytes release the haem enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase) and produce superoxide radicals and H2O2 via an oxidative burst. MPO uses H2O2 and Cl- to form HOCl, the physiological mixture of hypochlorous acid and its anion present at pH 7.4. As MPO binds to glycosaminoglycans, oxidation of extracellular matrix and cell surfaces by HOCl may be localized to these materials. However, the reactions of HOCl with glycosaminoglycans are poorly characterized. The GlcNAc (N-acetylglucosamine), GlcNSO3 (glucosamine-N-sulphate) and GlcNH2 [(N-unsubstituted) glucosamine] residues of heparan sulphate are potential targets for HOCl. It is shown here that HOCl reacts with each of these residues to generate N-chloro derivatives, and the absolute rate constants for these reactions have been determined. Reaction at GlcNH2 residues yields chloramines and, subsequently, dichloramines with markedly slower rates, k2 approximately 3.1x10(5) and 9 M(-1) x s(-1) (at 37 degrees C) respectively. Reaction at GlcNSO3 and GlcNAc residues yields N-chlorosulphonamides and chloramides with k2 approximately 0.05 and 0.01 M(-1) x s(-1) (at 37 degrees C) respectively. The corresponding monosaccharides display a similar pattern of reactivity. Decay of the polymer-derived chloramines, N-chlorosulphonamides and chloramides is slow at 37 degrees C and does not result in major structural changes. In contrast, dichloramine decay is rapid at 37 degrees C and results in fragmentation of the polymer backbone. Computational modelling of the reaction of HOCl with heparan sulphate proteoglycans (glypican-1 and perlecan) predicts that the GlcNH2 residues of heparan sulphate are major sites of attack. These results suggest that HOCl may be an important mediator of damage to glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans at inflammatory foci.

KW - Animals

KW - Carbohydrate Conformation

KW - Chloramines

KW - Chlorides

KW - Computer Simulation

KW - Glycosaminoglycans

KW - Heparin

KW - Heparitin Sulfate

KW - Hypochlorous Acid

KW - Kinetics

KW - Oxidation-Reduction

KW - Proteoglycans

KW - Swine

U2 - 10.1042/BJ20050630

DO - 10.1042/BJ20050630

M3 - Journal article

VL - 391

SP - 125

EP - 134

JO - Biochemical Journal

JF - Biochemical Journal

SN - 0264-6021

IS - Pt 1

ER -

ID: 129671973